GFM Network News


As farmers are putting their next 
crop in, there’s controversy over how hard hit some producers have been, 
according to the latest income figures.

Farm income up amid calls for more farm aid

Do Prairie grain farmers need more government help? Not right now according to one producer

Long before COVID-19 disrupted agricultural markets, Canadian farm leaders were lobbying the federal government for money to offset the effect of trade disputes and harvest problems. But the latest farm income figures don’t necessarily back that call, showing, on the whole, Canadian farmers netted more money in 2019 than the year before. 2019 Canadian farm

Despite low rates, farm interest costs ballooned in 2019

Farm income may have been up in 2019, but expenses kept pace, according to government figures. Both cash receipts and operating expenses after rebates for Canadian farmers were up six per cent to $66 billion and $53 billion, respectively, according to Statistics Canada. One of the biggest increases in expenses was interest, up almost $600


Pot crop receipts obscure farm income figures

Measured by cash receipts cannabis ranks fourth behind canola, wheat and soybeans

It didn’t take long for cannabis to become a major crop in Canada. It was legalized for recreational use in October 2018. In 2019 cannabis cash receipts of $2.3 billion put it fourth behind canola ($8.6 billion), wheat, excluding durum ($5.4 billion), and soybeans ($2.5 billion). Cannabis narrowly beat grain corn which in 2019 generated

Most of the time markets move in what can be considered a sideways trend.

Expect the unexpected in markets

When the unexpected hits, price variation can exceed the expected very quickly

Last article, I talked about managing risk and uncertainty in the markets. As you might recall, there is an important difference between the two. Risk estimates everything we think might happen. Risk is our guess about what the future holds. More precisely, it is the range of things that might happen and how probable each

FarmCash currently offers no- and low-interest loans to Alberta farmers against 50 different products.

Alberta’s FarmCash considering expanding services to other provinces

The Alberta Wheat Commission (AWC) got into the cash advance business last year creating FarmCash Advance for Alberta farmers only, but it’s considering expanding to other provinces, says FarmCash chief operating officer Syeda Khurram. That’s despite a number of other well-established grain and oilseed advance administrators, including the Canadian Canola Growers Association (CCGA), Manitoba Corn Growers Association and


Canola holds steady as seeding gets underway

Crude oil pressures and potential for major soy exports weigh in on trading

Canola prices held steady during the week ended May 15, despite turbulence from outside markets. Nearby canola contracts started the week at $471.30 per tonne and traded on either side of unchanged for consecutive trading sessions during the week. On May 14, the July contract closed at $470.70 per tonne. July soyoil dropped by about

Australia to subsidize air freight

Aim it to unfreeze agri-exports shut down by virus

Australia’s government will spend A$110 million (C$95 million) to subsidize air freight for exports of agricultural products after flights were severely disrupted due to the global coronavirus pandemic. About 90 per cent of Australian air freight is usually transported in planes carrying tourists. But with scores of countries closing their borders to stop the spread

Even as railways set shipping records, year-end carry-over continues to grow.

Grain shipping. It’s a good news-bad news story

The grain-handling system keeps setting records, even as carry-out keeps rising

[UPDATED: June 5, 2020] Despite major setbacks earlier in the shipping season and COVID-19, Canada’s railways are setting grain shipping records. *Year-to-date movement to Vancouver, Prince Rupert and Thunder Bay is two per cent ahead of last crop year’s (2018-19) pace, which ended with a record of 34.9 million tonnes shipped. Total shipments to all



The provincial government wants to trim MASC salaries by as much as 20 per cent due to perceived technological efficiencies and in a possible response to dealing with the COVID-19 pandemic.

Pallister muses about cuts to Manitoba Agricultural Services Corp.

KAP says doesn't want Manitoba farmers' most important business risk management program to be undermined

Premier Brian Pallister appears to be determined to make funding cuts to the Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation (MASC), despite calls for caution from the Keystone Agricultural Producers. During his regular COVID news conference Tuesday, Pallister was asked why MASC salary cuts of up to 20 per cent are being considered. “Manitoba Ag Services has been