GFM Network News


U.S. grains: Corn, soy up on bargain-buying after Friday’s slump

Chicago wheat also climbs

Chicago | Reuters — U.S. corn and soybean futures rallied on Monday as commercial and technical buyers stepped in to take advantage of Friday’s steep declines, analysts said. Wheat futures firmed on bargain-buying after a four-session slide and improving export prospects. Chicago Board of Trade March corn settled up 11 cents at $5.11-1/2 per bushel,

U.S. grains: Soybeans dive to biggest weekly loss in 6-1/2 years

Soy, corn tumble on improved weather; wheat extends fall

Chicago | Reuters — Chicago soybean futures slid more than four per cent on Friday — while corn futures dropped their daily limit — as rains in key South American growing areas offered relief amid tight global supplies, overshadowing strong weekly U.S. export data. Wheat futures tumbled four per cent. The Chicago Board of Trade


U.S. grains: South American supply issues wane

Soy up, but off early gains; corn boosted by export demand

Chicago | Reuters — Chicago soybeans ended the session slightly up after a three-session losing streak on Thursday, but larger early gains were erased as rains across South America eased supply worries. Corn prices firmed, supported by fresh demand amid tightening global supplies, while wheat fell on a lack of fresh export news. The Chicago

Speculation that USDA could further drop ending stocks in February’s WASDE fuelled another round of increases in commodity futures.

U.S. WASDE points to lower ending stocks, lifts futures

The March contract set a new high based on USDA’s report

Within days before the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) issued its latest supply-and-demand report, there was speculation of further reductions to ending stocks for soybeans, corn and wheat. Such bullish news would see U.S. prices rise and spill over into canola. On Jan. 12 USDA released its world agriculture supply-and-demand estimates (WASDE), which slashed soybean ending stocks



CBOT weekly outlook: Soy, corn turn bearish

Traders keep an eye on South America

MarketsFarm — Soybean and corn futures backed away from multi-year highs during the week ended Wednesday, as investors took profits and weather conditions showed some improvement in South America. “The technicals are a little bearish for both corn and beans,” said Terry Reilly of Futures International in Chicago. The managed money long position in soybeans,

U.S. grains: Soybeans fall, pressured by fund selling

Brazil, Argentina showers ease soy, corn supply concerns

Chicago | Reuters — Chicago soybean futures fell on Wednesday, touching their lowest in more than a week, pressured by technical selling combined with rains across South America, which eased supply concerns. Corn followed, also pressured by beneficial South American rains, while wheat ended lower, but was supported by export optimism. The Chicago Board of

U.S. grains: Soybeans fall on South American rainfall

Russian export tax supports U.S. wheat; corn follows soybeans

Chicago | Reuters — Chicago soybean futures slid on Tuesday as rain across South America strengthened crop prospects and bolstered the global supply outlook, traders said. Corn followed soybeans lower, but was supported by strong export demand and possible export limits in Ukraine. Wheat futures fell slightly, but were bolstered by an export tax in


A photo taken Dec. 4 illustrates drought-affected crops in the Argentine province of Corrientes. The region is in the grip of the most intense drought in nearly 20 years.

Dry weather hits Argentine crops, soy markets in rationing mode

Weather woes and accelerating purchases by big buyers like China are boosting the market

Grains powerhouse Argentina is suffering a rainfall deficit of 150 to 300 millimetres with forecasts promising less moisture than necessary to fully refresh parched soy and cornfields, weather experts said recently as worry persisted about yield losses. Months of hot, dry weather have put the country’s two main cash crops at risk. Argentina is the

“Soils, wherever you are on the planet, were never formed with monocultures.” – Blake Vince.

This farmer sees cover crop benefits

It’s not just about the environment; it’s also about the bottom line

Farmer Blake Vince says he’s seen both benefits and challenges as he’s made cover crops part of his operation near London, Ont. At November’s Farm Forum Event virtual conference, he appeared by way of a pre-recorded presentation done weeks earlier at his no-till farm. Standing in the middle of a cover crop that was planted