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Labour peace will reign again at Maple Leaf Foods in Brandon after workers have endorsed a new collective agreement.

Maple Leaf reaches deal with plant workers

The pork industry is breathing a sigh of relief now that Maple Leaf Foods is back on an even keel with its workers

Production workers at Maple Leaf Foods in Brandon are celebrating after an eleventh-hour collective agreement with their employer passed muster. The United Food and Commercial Workers (UFCW) Local 832 branch has been in negotiations with the company since June. The previous contract, which covered 1,900 employees at the Brandon meat-processing plant, expired Dec. 31, 2019.

New malt varieties are being developed that nearly match the yields of feed and that will create new interest in barley, says breeder Aaron Beattie.

Wheat research coalition inks first major agreement

THE CWRC has committed over $9.6 million to the Crop Development Centre at the University of Saskatchewan

The Canadian Wheat Research Coalition (CWRC) has committed more than $9.6 million over five years to a ‘core breeding agreement’ with the Crop Development Centre (CDC) at the University of Saskatchewan. The funding will support the development of new spring wheat cultivars. The research dollars will increase field-based breeding activities, the disease nursery and disease

FarmIt Manitoba goes online

FarmIt Manitoba has become the home of analysis pieces and local Manitoba ag stories, now, those stories will be told online in a more visual and interactive way

Readers have noticed a change in the pages of the Manitoba Co-operator recently. Now, that change has hit the web. You can now find our crisp and clean new layout for your reading enjoyment as always at manitobacooperator.ca. But don’t stop there, there’s also our new FarmIt Manitoba section, which is getting its own unique

Two Manitoba farmers say Leons didn’t deliver equipment they bought — and paid for — in a timely fashion.

Buyer Beware: Protect yourself when buying farm equipment

Two farmers are cautioning others after their ag show purchases left them in the lurch

Two Manitoba farmers are warning others after they say an equipment maker took their money and didn’t deliver their purchases — in some cases, for years. “You think you’re getting a deal, and then this happens,” said Patricia Dooley. Patricia and husband Thomas Dooley, who produce beef and grain near Dauphin, ordered the 16-foot scraper

A new strategy to control grasshoppers can protect your crop, safeguard biological controls and cut your costs.

Cutting pesticide costs with RAATs

The technique is widely used to control grasshoppers in the U.S. but hasn’t found popularity in Manitoba

Reduced area and agent treatments (RAATs) may be a way to control grasshoppers and keep costs down in the coming year, entomologist John Gavloski told producers at St. Jean Farm Days on January 8. Gavloski, an extension entomologist with the province, showed grasshopper count maps from the last few years, which show a steady increase


Premier Brian Pallister says his government will stick to its guns when it comes to a carbon tax plan, including a flat rate and an exemption for grain drying.

KAP pegs carbon tax cost for grain drying at $1.7M

Both Keystone Agricultural Producers and the province are hoping the federal government will give ground on a carbon tax exemption for grain drying

Keystone Agricultural Producers says carbon tax cost corn producers $1.7 million in grain drying last fall. It’s money the provincial government says they shouldn’t have to pay. Both the province and Keystone Agricultural Producers (KAP) are pushing for a carbon tax exemption for grain drying, following 2019’s wet harvest. During his comments at Ag Days

Guy Ash demonstrates how weather station data is used to help inform production decisions.

Evolving technology creating new role for agronomists

New products and new information are changing how agronomists help the family farm

The technology explosion and changes to agricultural systems are altering the view of the average Canadian farm. New technology could mean different things to different people. To some farmers it could be bigger or smaller fields, buying some new equipment, or maybe some more advanced data utilization and management techniques. However, these changes don’t only

Trial and no errors

Planning ahead can make on-farm trials run smoothly

A successful on-farm trial doesn’t just appear out of thin air. It takes communication, collaboration and commitment. Those are the lessons a local farm equipment dealer and global life science giant have learned over the past few years as they’ve teamed up and begun taking research to commercial fields in Manitoba. Representatives of BASF and


Market management key in volatile times

A new provincial cost-of-production guide appears to project tough margins, but price volatility could mean opportunity

Market volatility calls for constant vigilance even as producers plan for the coming year, says provincial farm management specialist Darren Bond. Bond said prices are the most volatile they’ve been in years, and a “huge concern” for producers planning this year’s crops. “There will be highs and lows as the year goes on,” he said.

Manitoba producers are eligible for the Hay Disaster Benefit for a second year.

Short feed triggers Hay Disaster Benefit for second year

Until last year, Manitoba had never triggered the Hay Disaster Benefit built into AgriInsurance

Manitoba’s Hay Disaster Benefit has been activated for the second year in a row after forage once again fell short of expectations in 2019. Estimated payments are far in excess of last year. On Jan. 10, the provincial and federal governments said they expected payments to exceed $5 million for losses suffered in 2019, compared