Their ‘Speckles’ are showing

Anthony Wilcox bought his first Speckle Park cow for a simple reason: his wife liked them. “I thought that they were really good looking,” said Ariel Wilcox. Speckle Park, a breed developed in Saskatchewan, is known for its black and white, dotted pattern. The smaller-framed animals are generally hardy, good mothers and produce quality carcasses, arrow

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Videos

4-H members’ take on ‘Future Farmers’

For their Manitoba Ag Days presentation, “Agriculture; More than Cows, Sows and Plows,” Manitoba 4-H members Joryn Buchanan, Lauren McKee and Hanna Popp spoke about what they learned from their recent visit to the Future Farmers of America Convention this past October in Indianapolis. In this video, these three 4-Hers offer a few observations of

VIDEO: Author examines rural communities’ key to survival

Doug Griffiths, along with Kelly Clemmer, is one of the author’s of 13 Ways to Kill Your Community and one of the most recent speakers at the Association of Manitoba Municipalities annual convention Nov. 25-27. Griffiths spoke on 13 ways in which he says communities might block their economic development, including encouraging residents to shop

Reading your soil in real time

Erik Eising, founder and inventor of SoilReader, explains how his coulter technology analyzes soil nutrients in real time and how the invention was received at Agritechnica, and Terry Aberhart of Aberhart Farms in Saskatchewan talks about his interest in adopting the technology upon his return to Canada. (Recorded at Agritechnica 2019) Video by Melanie Epp

Faces of Ag

Anthony Wilcox, along with his dad and grandpa, raise purebred Simmental and Speckle Park cattle near Treherne.

Their ‘Speckles’ are showing

Anthony Wilcox bought his first Speckle Park cow for a simple reason: his wife liked them. “I thought that they were really good looking,” said Ariel Wilcox. Speckle Park, a breed developed in Saskatchewan, is known for its black and white, dotted pattern. The smaller-framed animals are generally hardy, good mothers and produce quality carcasses, arrow

Terri Decock and Devon Woodward attempt to pose with sow Dacotah, who is more interested in the camera.

From city slicker to pig whisperer

“Babies!” Terri Decock calls. “Come see!” The blanket door to the red barn lifts. Fifteen ginger and spotted pigs dash into the snowy yard to mill around Terri’s feet and nudge a giggling reporter with their upturned snouts. They are KuneKune weanlings. The medium-size, roly-poly breed was originally raised by the Maori people in New arrow

Deep Dive

VIDEO: Author examines rural communities’ key to survival

Doug Griffiths tackles 13 ways communities might accidentally be setting themselves up for failure when it comes to economic development

Doug Griffiths, along with Kelly Clemmer, is one of the author’s of 13 Ways to Kill Your Community and one of the most recent speakers at the Association of Manitoba Municipalities annual convention Nov. 25-27. Griffiths spoke on 13 ways in which he says communities might block their economic development, including encouraging residents to shop Watch the video arrow

VIDEO: Timing fungicide decisions in canola and cereal crops

Crop Diagnostic School: A relatively dry growing season in 2019 didn't rule out fusarium issues

At Crop Diagnostic School in July, David Kaminski, plant pathologist with Manitoba Agriculture, said 2019 was a challenge for producers when it came to timing fungicide applications. In this video, Kaminski discusses some of the conditions Manitoba producers faced this growing season in their canola and cereal crops and some of the factors at play Watch the video arrow

VIDEO: Six things you can do to avoid clubroot

As the threat of clubroot grows in Manitoba, these steps can go a long way to protect your canola crop

Wondering what you can do avoid clubroot in your canola? At Crop Diagnostic School in Carman this past July, Dane Froese with Manitoba Agriculture offered six things producers can do to help reduce their risk of having clubroot appear in their fields. Watch the video arrow

Recent Articles

PHOTOS: Faces and places at Manitoba Ag Days

Freelance photographer Sandy Black is the quintessential shutterbug, and his keen eyes behind the lens this week at Manitoba Ag Days were in full swing. Here, Sandy shares a few of his photos with the Manitoba Co-operator that captured some of the sights at the show. Photos: Sandy Black

Their ‘Speckles’ are showing

Anthony Wilcox bought his first Speckle Park cow for a simple reason: his wife liked them. “I thought that they were really good looking,” said Ariel Wilcox. Speckle Park, a breed developed in Saskatchewan, is known for its black and white, dotted pattern. The smaller-framed animals are generally hardy, good mothers and produce quality carcasses,

Evolving technology creating new role for agronomists

The technology explosion and changes to agricultural systems are altering the view of the average Canadian farm. New technology could mean different things to different people. To some farmers it could be bigger or smaller fields, buying some new equipment, or maybe some more advanced data utilization and management techniques. However, these changes don’t only

Trial and no errors

A successful on-farm trial doesn’t just appear out of thin air. It takes communication, collaboration and commitment. Those are the lessons a local farm equipment dealer and global life science giant have learned over the past few years as they’ve teamed up and begun taking research to commercial fields in Manitoba. Representatives of BASF and

Comment: No need for potato panic

Most of us love fries and chips. Other than people on a ketogenic diet, most diets don’t discriminate against the mighty potato. It’s even in Canada’s newest food guide. Most dishes using potatoes are loved by Canadians, especially in the wintertime, when colder weather encourages us to seek out more hearty meals. But reports suggest

Like it or not, climate change will change your farm, say two experts

Canada’s best-known climatologist always knows when he’s lost a crowd of producers he’s presenting to. It’s usually right around the time he starts talking about climate change. But he gets it. “Farmers have been beat up a lot — they’ve been accused of causing climate change,” said David Phillips, Environment and Climate Change Canada’s senior

With roots going back to 1925, each weekly issue of the Manitoba Co-operator contains production, marketing and policy news selected for relevance to crops and livestock producers in Manitoba.

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