GFM Network News


Cereals Canada, Grain Growers of Canada favour private grain inspectors over CGC

Cereals Canada, Grain Growers of Canada favour private grain inspectors over CGC

AAFC is compiling the feedback and will publish a summary on its website

Cereals Canada and the Grain Growers of Canada (GGC) want inspectors from private companies to replace the mandatory inspection currently done by Canadian Grain Commission (CGC) staff on Canadian grain exported by ship. Their positions are in submissions to Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada AAFC, which is reviewing the Canada Grain Act and the CGC’s role

“When you have a basis that’s positive it’s something, but when it’s $100 a tonne that’s remarkable.” – Bill Craddock.

Old-crop canola price records keep falling

New-crop prices are strong, but how much will farmers sell given rising drought fears?

Bill Craddock has seen a lot in his 52 years speculating in grain futures markets, but never $1,000-a-tonne canola on the crusher’s driveway — until last week that is. On May 5 Manitoba farmers could lock in canola at $1,021 a tonne ($23.15 a bushel) with Altona crusher Bunge for delivery Aug. 1 to 15,


New-crop insurance feature lets farmers pay for higher canola values

New-crop insurance feature lets farmers pay for higher canola values

Farmers who lock in higher canola prices can use the Contract Price Option to backstop some of the production risk

As of last week farmers could lock in $16 to $17 a bushel new-crop canola, but the spectre of drought may discourage some from pre-selling as much as they would if it wasn’t so dry. It’s hard not to take advantage of such strong prices. And while there’s no guarantee, odds are they will likely

Outward inspection is one of the biggest bones of contention in a review of the Canada Grain Act and Canadian Grain Commission.

Where’s the Canadian Grain Commission headed?

Industry groups outline changes they want in the Canada Grain Act and Canadian Grain Commission

The future of the Canadian Grain Commission (CGC), whose statutory mandate since 1912 has been to regulate western Canadian grain quality in the interest of farmers, is getting closer to being determined. Why it matters: For 109 years the Canadian Grain Commission, under authority of the Canada Grain Act, has regulated Western Canada’s multibillion-dollar grain

More market transparency needed

Grain act reviews trigger farmer calls for more grain sales data collection

Western grain farmers need more timely information about grain sales and exports to improve market transparency and returns to farmers, the Saskatchewan Wheat Development Commission (Sask Wheat) says in its submission on changes to the Canada Grain Act and Canadian Grain Commission (CGC). The Agricultural Producers of Saskatchewan (APAS) and the National Farmers Union (NFU)


Mandatory Canadian Grain Commission outward inspection contentious

Mandatory Canadian Grain Commission outward inspection contentious

Some farm groups say it’s key to grain quality assurance, but the elevator association disagrees

Of all the issues concerning the Canadian Grain Commission (CGC), its role in outward inspection is one of the most contentious. The Saskatchewan Wheat Development Commission (Sask Wheat), Agricultural Producers of Saskatchewan (APAS) and the National Farmers Union (NFU) say in their submissions on the grain act and CGC that retaining mandatory CGC outward inspection

Richardson International, one of three major oilseed processors, recently announced plans to boost domestic canola crush capacity.

Big jump in Canadian canola-crushing capacity coming

It follows several years of back-to-back record domestic crushing of half the country’s domestic production

Western Canada will soon be able to crush a lot more canola, and Chris Vervaet is confident the seed will be there to do it. “We believe there will be a supply response to this demand pull that we are seeing for canola and canola products,” Vervaet, executive director of the Canadian Oilseed Processors Association

Screenshot from an Alberta Agriculture video profiling Innisfail-based pulse and grain handler W.A. Grain and Pulse Solutions. (Alberta Agriculture and Forestry via YouTube)

W.A. Grain enters receivership

Farmers owed money for grain delivered to this company should contact the Canadian Grain Commission

Alberta-based grain and pulse handler and processor W.A. Grain + Pulse Solutions went into receivership April 26. Farmers who delivered grain to its faculties in Alberta and Saskatchewan but haven’t been paid should contact the Canadian Grain Commission (CGC). “We have not commenced a claims process yet,” CGC spokesman Remi Gosselin said in an interview


cgc

KAP recommends keeping grain commission’s mandate

It also wants to maintain CGC's role in in outward inspection and ensuring the quality of Canadian grain exports

The Canadian Grain Commission (CGC) should continue “to operate in the best interests of producers and Canadian grain industry an an independent third party to establish grain grades and standards.” That’s one of 17 recommendations Keystone Agricultural Producers (KAP) makes in its submission to Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC), which is seeking views on changes

Soybean growers need to be aware that a number of older varieties are about to see their registration cancelled at the start of the new crop year, August 1.

Know the soybean varieties you’re planting

A long list will see their registrations cancelled Aug. 1 and that could affect how they are sold

Manitoba farmers should take note of the soybean varieties they’re planting this spring. More than two dozen will have their registrations cancelled Aug. 1, which could affect crop marketing, says Manitoba Agriculture and Resource Development pulse crop specialist Dennis Lange. The surest way to know is by planting certified seed. “The way I view soybean