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Easter sale brings in the numbers

There were 360 sheep and goats delivered to the Winnipeg Livestock Auction on April 5 for the Easter season. Individual or small group of animals were purchased by various local individual buyers, for the two Easter celebrations. The meat industry buyers were preparing and restocking their supplies, as well.

There appeared to be a strong demand for younger ewes to assist in herd improvements. The culls were very noticeable, entering the arena — based upon age and some ailments. The price bidding on the culls remained much lower, than the other ewes. The price range for the hair sheep ranged from $0.80 to $0.99 per pound. The wool sheep price ranged from $0.86 to $0.99 per pound. Sheared ewes indicated an exception to this price range, as the bidding was much higher. The first group of two 170-pound Suffolk-cross ewes brought $176 ($1.04 per pound). The second group of three 157-pound Rideau-cross ewes brought $174.27 ($1.11 per pound). The audience was interested to see a family unit for bidding at this sale. This family unit was a ewe with two small lambs. The assurance that the value of these two lambs by the fall and inter-season, would be high by the auctioneer created major interest by the audience bidding. The ewe with the two lambs, brought $250.

Once again, the hair and wool rams remained in similar price ranges, with no breed dominating the bidding. The price ranged from $0.67 to $1.03 per pound, with regards to the various rams. A sheared 215-pound Dorset-cross ram, did not follow the pattern of the ewes as the price bidding remained average. Two Scottish black-face rams were delivered for this sale — very impressive animals with their huge set of horns. The first 180-pound Scottish black-face ram (purebred) brought $324 ($1.80 per pound). The other 155-pound Scottish black-face ram brought $139.50 ($0.90 per pound).

The heavyweight lambs kept a strong interest, illustrated by the bidding. However, the extreme heavier lambs, the price was lower. Lambs ranging in weight from 115 to 117 pounds brought $1.63 to $1.73 per pound, while lambs in the 123- to 145-pound range brought $1.40 to $1.55 per pound.

Market lambs did not dominate this sale. The selection was good, but the hair lambs, brought the lower price bidding. The hair lambs brought a price range of $0.825 to $1.075 per pound. The wool lambs brought a price range of $1.725 to $1.90 per pound.

The selection of feeder lambs was very limited. The bidding remained strong, ranging from $1.78 to $1.96 per pound. The 80-pound Scottish black-face lamb brought $152 ($1.90 per pound).

The price bidding on the lightweight lambs was random, with only the lambs near the feeder weight lambs provided stronger price bidding. Three 67-pound Dorper-cross lambs brought $122.25 ($1.825 per pound). One 50-pound Cheviot-cross lamb brought $50 ($1 per pound). Yet, 11 — 53-pound lambs brought $115 ($2.17 per pound). A 45-pound Jacob-cross lamb brought $75.38 ($1.675 per pound).

Nine 75-pound Cheviot-cross lambs brought $160 ($2.14 per pound). Eight 70-pound Cheviot-cross lambs brought $182 ($2.60 per pound). One 70-pound Katahdin-cross lamb brought $170.10 ($2.43 per pound).

The new-crop lambs appeared to dominate this sale, but no breed dominated. The heavier new-crop lambs produced the lower price bidding. The new-crop lambs in the weight range of 80 to 103 pounds, brought $2.02 to $2.22 per pound, (with some variation within this weight range). The new-crop lambs in the weight range of 45 to 78 pounds, brought $2.57 to $2.725 per pound.

In the goat classification, the does were selling under a strong bidding effect from the audience. The meat does were ranging in price from $1.26 to $1.65 per pound. The La Mancha (milking breed) created more interest. These 71-pound does brought $140-$1.97 per pound.

Once again, the bucks can be divided into the meat and dairy bidding. The Boer-cross bucks generated a price range from $1.05 to $2.14 per pound, the heavier bucks producing the lower end of this range.

The Alpine-cross bucks produced a price range from $1.16 to $2.07 per pound. A La Mancha buck brought $1.43 per pound. A very dominant 75-pound Pygmy-cross buck, brought $100 ($1.33 per pound).

Boer-cross goats dominated the wether classification of the goats, sold at this sale. The heavier wethers produced a lower price bidding, compared to the lighter-weight wethers. The 165- and 130-pound wethers brought $170 and $165 ($1.03 and $1.27 per pound), while the wethers in the weight range of 55 to 85 pounds brought $2.22 to $1.65 per pound.

A 70-pound Boer-cross buckling, brought $1.46 per pound. A 70-pound Boer-cross Alpine buckling brought $1.90 per pound. A group of 75-pound Boer-cross bucklings brought $1.84 per pound.

Six 61-pound Alpine-cross goats brought $126 ($2.07 per pound).

Goats in the weight ranging from 52 to 55 pounds brought a price range of $2.02 to $2.15 per pound.

The demand on the lightweight goats was as high as the new-crop lambs,creating a wilder bidding scheme, throughout the audience. The lighter goats, ranging in the 43- to 45-pound area brought a price range of $2.22 to $2.26 per pound.

The 35-pound Alpine-cross goat brought $100 ($2.86 per pound). The two 38-pound Boer-cross goats brought $89 ($2.34 per pound).

The Ontario Stockyard Report (April 2, 2012 ), stated the well-fed new-crop lambs sold at high prices ($2.67 to $3.24 per pound). Sheep and the other lambs sold at a steady price. The lightweight goats sold at a premium, while the other goats sold steady.

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