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How to grow 70 bushel canola

Manitoba Ag Days speaker has a tip for growers looking to get the most out of their canola yields.

It’s not the pots and pans that count in baking, it’s the ingredients, Birch Hills, Sask., farmer Florian Hagmann told the opening day of Ag Days here Tuesday.

Last year on 5,000 acres Hagmann’s canola averaged 70 bushels an acre.

When it comes to maximizing yields its the little things that count, Hagmann said.

It starts with field selection. Based on a farmer’s own experience he or she knows which fields have the most potential to yield.

To reduce risk, Hagmann said he doesn’t push for ultra high yields in every field.

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Top yields start with healthy soil, which means increasing the microbial population, improving water retention, good crop emergence, increasing root count and size, which will enhance nutrient uptake.

After setting a yield target, soil tests are necessary to know how many nutrients are already there and then calculate how many more are needed, he said.

Hagman stressed the importance of getting nutrients close to plant roots, without causing damage. That’s why he splits his fertilizer application — some goes with the seed and more is added later, depending on how well the crop is doing.

Hagmann said his input costs are high, but it usually pays.

Hagmann stressed applying the nutrients the crop needs and pest control are more important than the type of seeder or combine used.

Read more about how Hagmann achieves high canola yields in an upcoming issue of the Manitoba Co-operator.

About the author

Reporter

Allan Dawson

Allan Dawson is a reporter with the Manitoba Co-operator based near Miami, Man. Covering agriculture since 1980, Dawson has spent most of his career with the Co-operator except for several years with Farmers’ Independent Weekly and before that a Morden-Winkler area radio station.

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