GFM Network News


Clubroot and other crop diseases have startlingly similar transmission pathways and preventive measures as public health challenges such as COVID.

How canola diseases act like COVID-19

There are startling similarities between public health and plant health as coronavirus precautions reveal

With the COVID-19 pandemic, society is gaining a whole new understanding of how diseases spread and how following proper precautions can make a huge impact on slowing the spread. While the human stakes are lower for crop diseases, the economic stakes can be high — and the similarities between COVID-19 and crop disease management is

Supply chain working but canola groups have concerns

Federal field trials need to continue and growers need protective equipment, they say

There have been no issues so far with supplies of inputs and parts, transportation or oilseed processing during the pandemic, canola industry officials report. “We’ve been really focused on making sure farmers have access to inputs and resources to get the 2020 crop in the ground,” Canola Council of Canada president Jim Everson said during


Turning precision ag data into higher profits

Seeding and Tillage: The fast-evolving technology can bring a lot of value if you know how to manage it

Adam DeVisser is a recent convert to using precision agriculture, but he’s practical about its application. “The value is not in computers making decisions for us, but in us making more informed decisions,” he said at a recent crops conference in Ontario. DeVisser and his fellow panellists — farmer Mark Brock and Brandon Dietrich of

A cover crop cocktail?

Pre-made mixes promise an easy jumping-off point on cover crops, but some worry that they increase the amount at risk

Joe Gardiner of Clearwater has spent a lot of effort getting ahead of the curve on cover crops. His cover mixes can include up to 15 species in a season-long cover. He does relay cropping. He picks his seed to include a range of cool- and warm-season plants, legumes, forbs, broadleafs and grasses. He thinks



On-farm research can best answer producer questions

Good things happen when farmers take field research into commercial farms

For most people agriculture research starts and ends with the small-plot work of research scientists and plant breeders at places like the Brandon Research Centre. Passing by their fields along the Grand Valley Road during the growing season reveals a patchwork quilt of small plots looking at everything from disease resistance to trait expression. There are some good reasons for the

Don Flaten shows the students how to mix and package soil samples to be sent to the lab.

Revisiting the basics of soil sampling and testing

We 
tagged along 
with agronomy students for a soil-sampling primer, and how 
it helps farmers 
make informed decisions

Soil testing. One could call it the agricultural equivalent of a blood test, which shows which and what quantity of nutrients are in the soil so producers can make informed decisions about next year’s nutrient strategy. But less than half of farmers soil test every year, according to stats from Manitoba Agriculture. In 2016, 41

Telus buys Farm At Hand

Vancouver farm management software development firm Farm At Hand has become an arm of one of the Big Five in Canada’s communication services sector. Farm At Hand, which makes the cloud-based Crop Planner software suite for farmers and the Farm At Hand Agronomy suite for agronomists, announced Tuesday it has been wholly acquired by Telus


Sylvite set to buy Thompsons agronomy business

Ontario grain and bean handler Thompsons Ltd. is set to sell its crop agronomy business to a retail business partner in that province. U.S. grain firm The Andersons, the owner of Thompsons since January, announced Tuesday in its second-quarter report it plans to sell Thompsons’ “agronomy assets” to Burlington, Ont.-based Sylvite Holdings. Financial terms of