GFM Network News


Joey Fiola and Christel Lanthier and their three daughters, Olivia (6), Anne Rose (4) and Lila (1).

Resurrecting the family farm

Faces of Ag: Joey Fiola and Christel Lanthier are determined to give their girls the same farm life that shaped them

As 25 ewes and a gangly baby llama mill around Christel Lanthier, her six-year-old daughter chats to her in French, the language they speak at home. She’s wondering if you want to know anything about the cats, Christel translates for a reporter. Olivia explains the names of the three cats and shows off her stuffed

“With AgriStability you are protecting a margin and it’s more coverage than you think.”

The quest for a perfect farm safety net program

There’s a long list of plans that have come and gone

The perfect farm income stabilization program is as elusive as utopia itself. But a lot of farmers say they would be happy if AgriStability’s payout trigger went back to an 85 per cent, instead of the current 70. But that would cost governments potentially a few hundred millions of dollars more, estimates University of Saskatchewan


“We don’t even know what the potential is when we let people do what they’re good at and what they enjoy.” – Teresa Vallotton.

Ag tech needs farm kids

Our younger generation needs to know its skills are needed in more areas than just a combine cab. This is where Teresa Vallotton’s coding camps come in

In a room overlooking a bustling trade show, 20 kids huddle over laptops. They’re trying to catch a thief. Teresa Vallotton flashes pictures across the screen at the front of the room and asks them — is this the person who’s been stealing fuel from the tank on her yard? The kids run facial recognition

There’s a world of difference between liquid and solid manure and how both provide nutrients to crops.

Manure: The gift that keeps on giving

Not all manure is created equally when it comes to field applications

How long can manure provide value to farmers’ fields after application? The short answer is that it depends on what you mean by ‘manure,’ and how and when you’re applying it, according to a 10-year study from the University of Manitoba’s National Centre for Livestock & Environment (NCLE). NCLE has been evaluating the short- and

A cover crop cocktail?

Pre-made mixes promise an easy jumping-off point on cover crops, but some worry that they increase the amount at risk

Joe Gardiner of Clearwater has spent a lot of effort getting ahead of the curve on cover crops. His cover mixes can include up to 15 species in a season-long cover. He does relay cropping. He picks his seed to include a range of cool- and warm-season plants, legumes, forbs, broadleafs and grasses. He thinks



Flea beetles were aggressive feeders in 2019, leading to multiple spray passes for some farmers.

Year in review: Keep an eye out for these critters in 2020

Entomologist John Gavloski says these should be on your radar

Based on what went on in Manitoba fields this past season, producers may want to be on the lookout for several insects in 2020 that could potentially make a reappearance. At the top of the list are flea beetles, cutworms and grasshoppers, according to Manitoba’s provincial entomologist, John Gavloski. Speaking at the recent Manitoba Agronomists

Cover crops may buffer bad spring in 2020

This fall had little window for fall-seeded cover crops, but those who already have cover crops in the ground say it’s now their best insurance against a wet spring

Joe Gardiner of Clearwater has an insurance policy against a wet spring next year — and it has nothing to do with MASC. Gardiner is one of a growing number of Manitoba farmers to embrace cover crops, having started the practice several years ago in an effort to increase fall grazing. This year, he jumped


The learning curve of cover crops

Cover crops may have an almost endless number of combinations, but end goals, planting windows and seed costs may help narrow down species selection

It’s not enough to convince producers to give cover crops a shot — there needs to be a game plan. There are plenty of reasons why. Seed can be expensive, especially if there’s no livestock to help recoup that cost through their digestive systems. Many worry the fall seeding window is too narrow to give

University of Manitoba seeks Certificate of Merit nominations

The annual award is for agriculture diploma and degree holders

Do you know a University of Manitoba degree or diploma holder who’s distinguished themselves through leadership of agricultural organizations and outstanding service to the community at large? Then the U of M wants to hear from you. It’s seeking nominations for two certificates of merit, presented annually to a graduate of both programs. Nominations are