GFM Network News


Editor’s Take: Crop protection under fire

It’s shaping up to be a tough year on the crop-protection front. I don’t mean pests, diseases and weeds. For any producer, those are perennial challenges that will wax and wane with weather and pest pressure. I speak instead of the regulatory and legal fronts, where as you will read in our May 27 issue,

(File photo by Dave Bedard)

German cabinet approves legislation to ban glyphosate from 2024

Law would still need parliamentary approval

Berlin | Reuters — Farmers in Germany will have to gradually reduce their use of glyphosate and stop using it completely from 2024 in order to preserve clean habitats for insects, under draft legislation passed by the country’s cabinet on Wednesday. “The exit from glyphosate is coming. Conservationists have been working toward this for a


Flea beetles were aggressive feeders in 2019, leading to multiple spray passes for some farmers.

Year in review: Keep an eye out for these critters in 2020

Entomologist John Gavloski says these should be on your radar

Based on what went on in Manitoba fields this past season, producers may want to be on the lookout for several insects in 2020 that could potentially make a reappearance. At the top of the list are flea beetles, cutworms and grasshoppers, according to Manitoba’s provincial entomologist, John Gavloski. Speaking at the recent Manitoba Agronomists

Currently available crop protection products can only knock back wireworms, not eliminate them.

Are wireworms’ days numbered?

Once you have wireworms, it’s hard to get rid of them, but that might be changing once BASF’s new seed treatment launches in 2021

Growers will soon be able to knock back wireworm populations rather than just holding the line. BASF says it is two years away from launching its new cereal seed treatment, Teraxxa, on both sides of the Canada-U.S. border. The seed treatment will introduce a new chemistry to the market. Teraxxa will be a Group 30

A new pesticide safety review system aims at being more predictable while protecting public health and the environment.

Common sense needed in pesticide reviews: agri-food groups

The PMRA has been stacking review upon review in some cases, critics say

Agri-food groups support provisions in the 2019 budget to trigger pesticide safety reviews when one is merited and not just because another country orders one on a product. While Health Canada and the Pesticide Management Regulatory Agency take a risk-based approach to pesticide approvals, other members of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development employ


Blooming rapeseed field at sunset

More debate yet to come on neonics

Health Canada has satisfied its concern with three neonicotinoid insecticides and pollinator risk, but a decision to protect aquatic insects may yet take those chemistries off the table

Health Canada’s April decisions on three neonicotinoid insecticides won’t change much for growers this year — but it also won’t be the last word on the subject. Producers will still have access to most imidacloprid, clothianidin and thiamethoxam uses following the April 11 ruling. In 2016, the federal government announced plans to phase out imidacloprid

“PMRA’s re-evaluation decision confirms that in the vast majority of cases, neonics can be used effectively by farmers without unnecessary risk to pollinators.” – Pierre Petelle, CropLife Canada

No new major neonic restrictions: Health Canada

Existing restrictions remain, but they won’t be expanded for the foreseeable future

No new changes are coming to the use of neonicotinoids in Canada. There will be no new significant restrictions beyond those announced last year, Health Canada said April 10 in its final decision on its review of clothianidin, imidacloprid and thiameth­oxam. The department said it will proceed with cancelling some uses of the products and

Manitoba Agriculture’s Pratisara Bajracharya says periodic reviews of pesticides are a part of the regulatory landscape in Canada.

How and why: What drove the proposed neonic ban?

There are a number of reasons a pesticide might come under review after registration

As growers still wait for the final decision on whether certain neonicotinoid seed treatments will be banned in Canada, many are still scratching their heads about how the proposed ban came about. As it happens, the re-evaluation of pesticides is a legal requirement and it was during a periodic routine re-evaluation that the Pest Management


Older products like DDT, seen here in an advertisement from a 1948 issue of Saturday Night magazine, have routinely been replaced by newer and safer products.

Regulatory process improving safety

Older, less safe products have always been phased out for newer, safer ones. The latest issue with neonics is nothing new

The reality of chemical controls is always going to be that relatively speaking they’re a blunt tool. But that also means they’re going to be under scrutiny to ensure their safety. And the safety track record of these products is getting better and better by the season, according to John Gavloski, provincial entomologist. “In an

Without a viable alternative to clothianidin and thiamethoxam, the Canola Council of Canada feels “the ban will significantly impact the canola sector.”

Agri-food sector gearing up for neonic consultations

Government says it will listen to concerns about lack of useful alternatives to neonics

Farm groups are readying for battle over the federal government’s proposal to phase out more neonicotinoid pesticides. They’ve signalled their intention to grill Health Canada and the Pesticide Management Regulatory Agency (PMRA) over their plans to eliminate the use of clothianidin and thiamethoxam over the next three to five years because they pose a threat