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Eat More Fibre This Summer

This dietary change could result in a nine-pound weight loss in a year.

Eating more high-volume, fibre-rich foods will fill you up without filling you out, but most of us shortchange ourselves on the fibre recommendation, which averages about 25 grams per day for adults. Fibre is indigestible plant material found in foods such as cooked, dry edible beans, fruits, vegetables, whole grains, nuts and seeds. Fruit smoothies made with fresh berries fill the bill as a fibre-rich snack also, and they’re easy to make if you have a blender or food processor.

Studies have shown that women who doubled their fibre intake from 12 grams to 24 grams per day absorbed 90 fewer calories a day. This dietary change could result in a nine-pound weight loss in a year.

Besides helping with weight management, eating a fibre-rich diet also plays a role in helping prevent some chronic diseases, such as heart disease.

Remember to increase your fibre intake slowly, as adding fibre too quickly can cause gastrointestinal discomfort, such as gas, bloating and cramps.

Drink plenty of water when increasing your fibre intake because too much fibre without adequate fluid can lead to constipation. Fibre can absorb about 10 times its weight in water.

Here’s some tips to add fibre to your diet.

Enjoy whole-wheat pasta, brown rice and whole-grain bread.

Read breakfast cereal labels. Look for cereals with about five grams of fibre per serving.

Add beans, such as pinto, navy or kidney beans, to your favourite soups, casseroles or salads.

Set out a bowl of fresh fruit so it’s ready to grab and go.

– Julie Garden-Robinson, PhD, L. R. D., is a North

Dakota State University Extension Service food and

nutrition specialist and associate professor in the department of health, nutrition and exercise sciences.

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Julie Garden-Robinson is a North Dakota State University Extension Service food and nutrition specialist and professor in the department of health, nutrition and exercise sciences.

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