GFM Network News


vegetable skewer

Be the grill master this spring

Prairie Fare: Foil Vegetable Packets

What should I grill for dinner tonight?” my husband asked the other day. I began naming a variety of possibilities. Then I paused and grinned. Buying him a grill for Father’s Day was the best gift I ever bought myself, our three kids and even our three dogs. We all enjoy the benefits of delicious

Prevent frozen septic systems

A few precautions could help stop this problem. Here’s some tips

Every winter, many people have to deal with the frustration of a frozen septic system. Dry soil conditions, very cold air temperatures and a lack of snow cover during an extended period all contribute to the problem, according to Tom Scherer, North Dakota State University Extension Service agricultural engineer for water quality and irrigation. “A


 PHOTO: THINKSTOCK

Prairie fare: prolific zucchini has many uses

Recipe Swap: Skillet Zucchini with Chopped Tomatoes and Beefy Zucchini Casserole

Julie is a North Dakota State University Extension Service food and nutrition specialist and professor in the department of health, nutrition and exercise sciences. I was admiring my neighbour’s garden the other day, especially her robust zucchini plants. I noticed some tender, young zucchini squash peeking out from under the foliage. I could almost taste

burned-out combine

Reduce the risk of a combine fire

Do a pre-harvest check, and carry a fire extinguisher

With harvest season underway, it’s time to take precautions against combine fires, says John Nowatzki, North Dakota State University Extension Service agricultural machine systems specialist. Crop residue buildup around combine engines and exhaust pipes are obvious places where fires can start. The surface temperature of exhaust pipes can be high enough to ignite straw and

Rapidly growing forages could cause deadly grass tetany

Rapidly growing forages could cause deadly grass tetany

Sufficient rainfall (greater than average in some regions) has many North Dakota pastures set for abundant, rapid forage growth this spring. “With this in mind, producers with cattle on pasture or planning their spring pasture turnout need to be aware of the possibility of grass tetany,” says Carl Dahlen, North Dakota State University Extension Service


Feed horses properly in winter

Winter is in full force, and horse owners need to make sure they feed their animals appropriately for the conditions, according to North Dakota State University Extension Service equine specialist Carrie Hammer. Feeding good-quality hay in sufficient amounts is one of the best ways to help horses keep warm. Feed digestion produces heat, with the

North Dakota State University develops farm fuel budget app

Farmers can use a new Farm Fuel Budget cellphone app to plan their farm fuel budget and use for the next year or more. John Nowatzki, North Dakota State University Extension Service agricultural machine systems specialist, developed the Android cellphone app for crop producers to compare projected fuel costs based on alternate crop acreages, tillage

Reconditioning soybeans in storage poses problems

Reconditioning low-moisture soybeans in storage can damage the grain bin, cautions Ken Hellevang, the North Dakota State University Extension Service’s grain-drying expert. Warm, dry fall weather can result in soybeans being harvested well below the market moisture content of 13 per cent. Hellevang says he has heard reports of harvested bean moisture contents as low


What causes evergreens to brown?

There are several reasons for browning needles on evergreens, whether they turn completely brown or have needles with brown tips and green bases. “There are several potential causes, but the correct cause may be difficult to determine,” says Joe Zeleznik, North Dakota State University Extension Service forester. “Insects, diseases, flooding or mild winter temperatures may

2012 wheat midge forecast low to moderate

North Dakota expects fewer wheat midge in 2012 and the outlook is similar for Manitoba. There could be some localized hot spots in western Manitoba but overall populations of the insect that can damage wheat kernels will be low to moderate, says Manitoba Agriculture, Food and Rural Initiatives entomologist John Gavloski. The presence of wheat