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Forecast: Hot weather expected to move in

Issued July 3, 2017 – Covering the period from July 5 14 to July 12, 2017

I’m beginning to sound like a broken record, but once again our weather was hijacked by an upper-level low. This one sat over northern Manitoba late last week, then dropped to the southeast early last weekend. This looks to be the last of these pesky upper lows as all of the weather models point toward a building upper-level ridge and warm to hot temperatures moving in.

This forecast period begins with a building ridge of high pressure. Currently, it looks as if the main axis of this ridge will stay to our southwest and this will be where the hottest temperatures are expected. Under the ridge we should see mainly sunny skies during the mornings and afternoons, but with our region being on the northern end of the ridge we will likely experience several chances for late-afternoon and evening thunderstorms. It is difficult to pin down any particular day for these storms as some days will stay sunny while others will see thunderstorms.

Temperatures look as though they will really heat up, especially late in the weekend and into next week. The latest weather models show daytime highs pushing the 30 C mark by Friday, with some mid- to even upper 30s possible by early next week. The best chances for the upper 30s will be over southwestern regions. Overnight lows will also be mild, with most nights only dropping into the mid- to upper teens.

It also looks like humidity might become a bit of a problem early next week, with dewpoints forecast to rise into the low 20s. Combine that with daytime highs in the low 30s and it will really begin to feel uncomfortable. Further ahead, it looks like the heat and relatively dry weather will continue, at least through to the middle of the month.

Usual temperature range for this period: Highs: 22 to 31 C; lows, 10 to 17 C.

About the author

Co-operator contributor

Daniel Bezte is a teacher by profession with a BA (Hon.) in geography, specializing in climatology, from the U of W. He operates a computerized weather station near Birds Hill Park.

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