GFM Network News


The Manitoba government announced it will extend a ban on moose hunting by another year.

Law banning night hunting proclaimed

Moose hunting bans extended, decried by First Nation and Metis groups

A law increasing restrictions on night hunting is now in force, the province announced today. Bill 29, which amends the Wildlife Management Act, passed in the legislature in 2018 but was not proclaimed into law until today. The law establishes a general prohibition on night hunting, minimum fines for people convicted of dangerous hunting, and

A great horned owl.

Nocturnal Owl Survey celebrates 30 years of counting owls

The survey began in 1991 and is now part of a nationwide owl-counting effort

This spring, the annual Manitoba Nocturnal Owl Survey will celebrate 30 years of counting owls — a remarkable achievement for an operation carried out mostly by volunteers. The Nocturnal Owl Survey began in Manitoba in 1991. It’s now part of a nationwide survey, although other provinces do not always follow the exact same format as


Coyotes, wolves and other predators are the focus of a new working group pilot project.

Livestock predation pilot given green light

Producers fighting predation loss got some news they’ve been waiting for Feb. 7

An upcoming pilot project is promising livestock producers some long-awaited answers on predation. Manitoba’s Livestock and Predation Working Group is about to start a three-year research pilot, which has been in the works for years since the working group formed in 2013. The province has announced $300,000 to help launch the Livestock Predation Prevention Project,

An “irruption” of snowy owls has brought many of the birds to southern Manitoba.

An invasion of owls

Why the snowy birds have descended from the Arctic to southern Manitoba isn’t thoroughly understood

Southern Manitoba has been invaded by snowy owls travelling far from their breeding ground north of the Arctic Circle. The owls began arriving as early as October. This phenomenon, called an “irruption,” happens at irregular intervals, usually every four or five years. Occasionally they happen two years in a row. Occasionally a “mega-irruption” may occur,

Manitoba cattle producers will now have wildlife loss insurance coverage for extended grazing practices.

Extended grazing to get wildlife loss coverage

Deer getting first bite at your swath grazing? Now there’s insurance for that

Cattle producers may not be able to keep wildlife off their grazing swaths, but at least now they can get paid for the loss. Bale grazing, swath grazing and grazing standing annual crops (including corn) will all be eligible for wildlife damage insurance this year, Manitoba Agricultural Services Corp. (MASC) has said. The new program


blaine pedersen

Crop insurance: What’s new in 2020?

The organic sector, farmers with extended grazing and high-value crop growers can all expect more insurance options this year

Crop insurance coverage is poised for another increase in 2020, according to Manitoba Agricultural Services Corp. (MASC). AgriInsurance coverage will hit $3 billion this year, with similar premiums to 2019. Why it matters: Better production knowledge has yields, and coverage, trending up, while the organic sector and producers with extended grazing will get more safety

Blue jays are especially fond of peanuts in the shell.

Feed your feathered friends this winter

Put out a bird feeding station this winter to attract those hardy enough to weather our winters

Cold weather has arrived, and most of our birds have migrated south, but the hardy ones are still around. A dozen or so species remain, and a feeding station kept regularly supplied will attract them to your backyard or deck for your viewing enjoyment, if you place the feeders where you can watch them easily.

Manitoba livestock producers have long-standing issues with livestock predation. They’re hoping a new super-department combining agriculture and some of the former conservation portfolio may help address them.

Livestock predation losses could gain fresh attention

Beef producers hope departmental amalgamation will kickstart action

Manitoba beef producers are hoping a provincial cabinet consolidation will mean action at long last on predation losses. They’ve had a long-standing complaint, but it was an agriculture issue that was under the authority of the provincial Conservation Ministry. Now fish and wildlife management is part of the new provincial Department of Manitoba Agriculture and


Jim and Bev Levandosky build birdhouses with a unique and artistic twist.

Couple’s retirement hobby is for the birds

Jim and Bev Levandosky of Strathclair create one-of-a-kind bird dwellings

A retired Strathclair couple has provided safe harbour for birds in locales as far-flung as British Columbia, Ontario and even the U.S. states of Colorado and Florida. Jim and Bev Levandosky have been building one-of-a-kind homes for their feathered friends for the past 10 years, full of character and colour. Their vast selection includes cabins,

Peter Galawan (far left), poses with family members and MHHC staff pose with a cairn honouring Galawan for his donation. Left to right: Peter Galawan, Debbie McDowell (niece of Peter), Carol Graham (MHHC habitat conservation specialist), Ernest DeLaRonde (nephew of Peter), Gary Galawan (nephew of Peter) and Curtis Hullick (MHHC field manager).

Oak Lake local honoured for land donation for wildlife

Grassland property will serve as permanent wildlife habitat

Oak Lake local Peter Galawan was honoured for his donation of property to the Manitoba Habitat Heritage Corporation on September 20. In 2017, Galawan donated a quarter section of land in the grassland flats of the Arrow Hills, according to a news release from MHHC. It contains Bailey’s Creek, a tributary of the Assiniboine River.