GFM Network News



ICE November 2021 canola (candlesticks) with 20-, 50- and 100-day moving averages (light yellow, dark yellow, dark green lines). (Barchart)

ICE weekly outlook: Challenging crop year ahead for canola

MarketsFarm — With declines in canola following Statistics Canada’s bullish-leaning projections for acres, it’s becoming more difficult to determine which way prices will trend in coming weeks and months. “Where are prices going to go? In any given year that’s challenging, especially in this year,” said David Derwin, analyst for PI Financial in Winnipeg. “That






MGEX May 2021 wheat (candlesticks) with K.C. May 2021 wheat (orange line), CBOT May 2021 wheat (red line) and Canadian dollar in U.S. cents (green line). (Barchart)

Prairie cash wheat: Bids mixed as loonie jumps

MarketsFarm — Bids for Canada Western Red Spring (CWRS) and Canada Western Amber Durum (CWAD) wheats dropped while those for Canada Prairie Spring Red (CPSR) wheat made their way upward during the week ending Wednesday. Wheat futures in the U.S. were mixed, while the Canadian dollar rose. The market reacted to both the prospective plantings

Japan temporarily sets higher tariffs on U.S. beef imports

Imports surpass the tariff-rate quota

Tokyo | Reuters – Japan is temporarily raising tariffs on U.S. beef imports as volumes have exceeded levels agreed to between the two nations for the fiscal year ending on March 31, Japan’s Agriculture Ministry said March 17. From March 18, the tariff will rise to 38.5 per cent from 25.8 per cent for 30

Farm Credit Canada’s chief economist says the agriculture sector is well positioned for the future.

Agriculture after the pandemic

It’s a whole alphabet of recovery options, FCC’s chief economist says

With COVID-19 vaccines rolling out for worldwide distribution and immunization on the horizon, now hopes turn to putting the virus in the rear-view mirror and rebuilding a battered global economy. That’s almost certainly going to mean enduring a sharp recession, says J.P. Gervais, chief economist for Farm Credit Canada. Speaking at the virtual Manitoba Agronomist


(Photo courtesy Canada Beef Inc.)

Klassen: Feeder cattle demand surges

Cow-calf producers already thinking spring

Compared to last week, western Canadian yearlings sold $3-$5 higher while calves traded $6 to as much as $10 higher. The return of moderate temperatures enhanced buying enthusiasm across the Prairies. Strength in deferred live cattle futures appeared to offset strong feed grain values. Yearling prices were rather soft through January and the first half

(WPohlDesign/iStock/Getty Images)

Klassen: Cold weather slows feeder cattle market activity

Compared to last week, western Canadian feeder cattle prices were relatively unchanged. Extreme temperatures blanketed Western Canada last week. Many auction barns cancelled sales or had limited numbers on offer. Buyers attended sales either in person or via the internet, which was supportive to the overall price structure. Many backgrounders and cow-calf producers delayed sales