GFM Network News


More ‘murder hornets’ found in B.C., Washington

Findings suggest some were able to overwinter

Reuters/Staff — Officials in British Columbia and Washington state have confirmed new sightings of the Asian giant hornet, dubbed the “murder hornet,” indicating the invasive, predatory insect survived the winter in the Vancouver area and U.S. Pacific Northwest. The stinging hornet, whose queens can grow as large as 2-1/2 inches in length, could potentially pose

Getting the jump on wild boar in Manitoba

Cost data out of the U.S. suggests we don’t want to be behind the 8-ball on wild pigs

Brooke Rossnagel of MacGregor has some inkling of the damage wild pigs can cause; he clearly remembers the aftermath after only a few found their way into his pasture a few years ago. “It looked like somebody took a plow to one of the hillsides,” he said, marvelling at the amount of damage given the


Orange hawkweed.

Look out for flowering invasive species

Red bartsia is an old enemy, but orange hawkweed is relatively new on Manitoba’s list of invasive species

They might look beautiful to the gardener’s eye, but orange hawkweed and red bartsia don’t have any friends in agriculture. Orange hawkweed, also known as devil’s paintbrush, has officially made its way into Manitoba after sightings in the municipalities of Piney and Stuartburn. The Tier 1 noxious weed is noted for its bright-orange to red

A wild boar wallows in the mud.

PHOTOS: Wild pigs on the loose

How many wild pigs are roaming agro-Manitoba? Nobody knows the answer to that question, and that’s going to be a problem for the province. Ryan Brook, a professor at the University of Saskatchewan who was educated at the University of Manitoba has the best handle, and even he admits his numbers are far from certain.

Editorial: Wild things roaming

A few years back, an acquaintance returned to school at mid-career and studied natural resource management. He was lucky enough to land a job with the province that first summer, checking boats at a stop on the Trans-Canada Highway at the Manitoba-Ontario border, to prevent the spread of zebra mussels. I mentioned that this sounded


Open season on wild pigs not the answer

Unfocused sport hunting will only 
make the problem worse

Is an open season on wild pigs the answer? Likely not, according to most of the experts, who say it’s likely that could actually make the problem worse. Private hunting may actually scatter a sounder and spread the problem unless the whole group is contained, Canadian Pork Council veterinary counsellor Dr. Egan Brockhoff said at

A wild pig sounder can grow very quickly in size.

Wild pigs on the loose: A pending threat in Manitoba

The population of feral pigs is growing and the province doesn’t have a strategy to address it

How many wild pigs are roaming agro-Manitoba? Nobody knows the answer to that question, and that’s going to be a problem for the province. Ryan Brook, a professor at the University of Saskatchewan who was educated at the University of Manitoba has the best handle, and even he admits his numbers are far from certain.

Farming insects may solve one problem, create others

Rome | Thomson Reuters Foundation — Insects have great potential as an alternative source of protein, but further research is urgently needed before mass production begins in order to avoid environmental disaster, Swedish researchers warned Monday. There is currently an “overwhelming lack of knowledge” on basic questions such as suitable species, their housing and feed


Candace Parks (centre) talks to attendees of a training session.

Aquatic invasive species training sessions held in Manitoba

Everyone needs to be aware and help protect our water bodies

Last month, fire trucks were temporarily removed from the Sandy Lake Fire Hall and replaced with a motorboat, Jet Ski, canoe, kayak and water-related equipment, such as paddles, anchors, fishing rods and bait buckets. Organized by the Riding Mountain Biosphere Reserve (RMBR) and Friends of Sandy Lake, with the assistance of the Municipality of Harrison

The U.S. Midwest has been fighting emerald ash borer for years. Seen here is a residential street in Toledo, Ohio. Both photos were taken in the summer. The first is from 2006 when emerald ash borer was first discovered, the second shows the near-total devastation the pest caused by 2009.

LAID WASTE: emerald ash borer a looming threat

A concerted effort will be necessary to preserve ash trees that shelter homes and fields

A village council in Manitoba’s Interlake thinks it’s a good idea to prevent an invasive insect from destroying local trees. Dunnottar just doesn’t know what it would do if emerald ash borer (EAB) chews its way into town. “We’ve sort of been aware of it,” said Village of Dunnottar Mayor Rick Gamble. “But we’re not