GFM Network News


If Earthshine increases, then Earth is reflecting more of the sun’s energy and as a result, the Earth should cool, and vice versa.

Weather school: Reflecting on albedo

Longer-range spring weather forecasts aren’t all in lockstep just yet

With COVID-19 forcing students to take a break from going to school, it doesn’t mean that they’re not supposed to still do schoolwork — so while I’m prepping online material for my students, I think it’s only fair we continue with my online weather course. This issue we’re going to continue our look at the

Private sector push will give farmers carbon opportunities

Companies like MacDonald’s and Maple Leaf foods will likely partner with farmers to offset emissions

Western Canadian farmers lead the world in reducing greenhouse gas emissions — they just don’t get paid for it, says an expert in the carbon-credit market. But that’s starting to change, said Jon Alcock, sustainability specialist at Viresco Solutions, a company that develops carbon credits and “carbon intensity scores.” Compliance-based carbon offset credits in Canada


Weather school: Five reasons for the seasons

Earth is a spinning top tilted to one side – and is always tilted in the same direction

In our previous Weather School class we looked at incoming solar radiation and the solar constant. With no new or exciting happenings in our local weather, we’re going to continue our look at how the incoming energy from the sun drives the seasons and weather we experience here on Earth. Net global radiation is the

Weather school: Insolation and the solar constant

Equatorial regions get about 2.5 times more incoming solar energy than polar regions

In my last article, we gently stuck our toes into the idea of going back to school with our first weather school class. In that class we discussed how the sun creates energy and then how that energy travels from the sun to Earth. Today we will start to look at how that energy is

Farmer Jeff McCole, 70, pauses in front of his family home destroyed by bushfire in Buchan, Victoria, Australia, Jan. 23, 2020.

In fire-hit rural Australia, climate change debate burns deep

Per capita, Australia has one of the world’s highest carbon footprints

Reuters – Returning from a morning feeding his sheep, Jeff McCole, a 70-year-old farmer, paused to take in the bittersweet scene – a few droplets of rain falling onto the remains of his fire-ravaged home. “Nothing like the sound of rain on a tin roof,” he said, as he scanned the residue of a lifetime of memories scattered


Dean Harder farms near Lowe Farm, Manitoba.

Farmer-led campaign to inform, lobby for climate solutions

Farmers for Climate Solutions wants any conversation on climate change to include agriculture

A Manitoba farmer says a new agriculture-led campaign for climate solutions gives producers a chance to learn from each other while moving the needle on climate action. “This gives a place, a location for those that have that mentality — I think the majority of farmers actually fit in that category — to make a

Steven Rosenzweig says General Mills is promoting regenerative agriculture because it helps meet the company’s sustainability goals.

Regenerative ag finds a corporate champion

General Mills supports regenerative agriculture, but says it’s not about something to slap on its label

[UPDATED: Feb. 3, 2020] When the topic of who might drive a regenerative agriculture push comes up, one name keeps cropping up: General Mills. The Minnesota-based producer of packaged consumer goods first staked out its claim to this turf by promising in 2015 to source its top 10 ingredients sustainably by 2020. As it nears

ALUS Little Saskatchewan River program co-ordinator Colleen Cuvelier (left), and ALUS Canada’s Prairie hub manager, Paige Englot (right), on an ALUS project site in Manitoba.

Room to GROW

Monitoring and evaluation of conservation projects, like those funded under the GROW Trust, have typically been underdeveloped, experts say

Manitoba has a chance to set a precedent with the way it monitors outcomes from the GROW Trust, says Lara Ellis, ALUS Canada’s senior vice-president of policy and partnerships. Monitoring and evaluation of conservation projects like those under the GROW Trust have “never been that developed,” Ellis said. The first three projects under the GROW


Like it or not, climate change will change your farm, say two experts

The growing season is already longer and extremes more common, say climatologist and crop specialist

Canada’s best-known climatologist always knows when he’s lost a crowd of producers he’s presenting to. It’s usually right around the time he starts talking about climate change. But he gets it. “Farmers have been beat up a lot — they’ve been accused of causing climate change,” said David Phillips, Environment and Climate Change Canada’s senior

Alum a useful tool to combat toxic algae

The chemical has been used in the U.S. to clear lakes of algal blooms but hasn’t seen widespread acceptance in Canada

It’s no magic bullet, but aluminum sulphate can significantly reduce toxic algal blooms in lakes, American scientist John Holz told conservationists at a Winnipeg conference on December 3. “It is a common tool,” said Holz, whose company HAB Aquatic Solutions, has done 104 applications of the product, also called ‘alum,’ in the U.S. Holz spoke