GFM Network News


A report suggests that increasing soil carbon levels is one way to limit greenhouse gas emissions that exacerbate climate change.

Opinion: IEA report has consequences for agricultural producers

The International Energy Agency’s (IEA) widely publicized report on reducing greenhouse gas emissions to achieve global targets further bolsters the case more needs to be done in agriculture to combat climate change. Producers, as the report notes, can’t be excluded from that effort. Released this month, the report lists 400 actions that will need to

A new recycling program has been announced for grain bags and bale twine in Manitoba.

Agri-plastic recycling program launched

Bale twine and grain bags will be accepted under the new provincially regulated program

Manitoba is looking to recycle more agricultural plastics. On May 26, the province announced the launch of an agri-plastics stewardship program targeting grain bags and bale twine, to be managed by agricultural recycling organization Cleanfarms. “What this means, really, is that farmers have access to a reliable program and one that’s going to be available year over year to recycle their grain


Manitoba farmers recycled 38.4 tonnes of grain bags, twine and bale and silage wrap in 2020.

Cleanfarms Manitoba sees slight recycling dip in 2020

Canada-wide, Cleanfarms has recycled enough containers to stretch around the world 1.3 times

Manitoba farmers recycled 38.4 tonnes of grain bags, twine, and bale and silage wrap in 2020, down from about 51 tonnes in 2019, says Cleanfarms’ 2020 report. The ag recycling organization attributes the dip to COVID-19 restrictions and lower spring volumes. Canada-wide, collection was on par or slightly up in many categories. Producers returned more

Operating in a comparatively more theatrical political environment than Canada, U.S. President Joe Biden is tasked with convincing producers he does not plan on banning hamburgers.

Opinion: U.S., Canada have same challenge in selling green policies to producers

Farmers aren’t typically core constituents of Liberals or Democrats

President Joe Biden and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau are fighting the same fight in trying to get farmers on board with ambitious climate plans. Industry groups and associations in both countries will say already efforts are being made to reduce emissions, but critics say otherwise. The U.S. administration’s new, unprecedented dedication to fighting climate change

Scott Moe contends carbon stored by the Saskatchewan producers “should be recognized going back decades.”

Opinion: Scott Moe’s carbon credit stance unsalable

Emitters won’t recognize — or pay for — carbon sequestered decades ago

Saskatchewan Premier Scott Moe continuing to believe farmers should be credited for decades-old actions demonstrates his overall reluctance to recognize the significance of climate change. Beaten by the Supreme Court of Canada, Moe is now in the unenviable position of having to develop and introduce a carbon pricing policy. Most of his constituents don’t want


A field and a patch of prairie are very different, but some similar principles can apply.

The many faces of resiliency: Resilience lessons can be learned from nature

There are no simple answers when it comes to protecting farms and the environment

About a year ago the COVID-19 lockdowns led to an odd phenomenon. Home bakers went to the store looking for yeast and found the shelf completely cleaned out. If you asked a grocer about it you were told that there’s none to be had, even the warehouse was empty. The entire stock was bought out

Letters: Buying carbon indulgences

I find David McInnes’s gushing about Canada’s record in food sustainability appears to be suspect. I duly note that he is under contract to 22 various and sundry special interest groups seeking some sort of good agribusiness seal of approval for food sustainability. You report Maple Leaf Foods, of listeriosis infamy, buying indulgences in response

Fire, flood and drought have all been part of the Australian agriculture experience in the past year, causing a rising recognition of the perils of global warming.

Aussie farmers cutting carbon to stay competitive

Two growers presenting to an international conference say this is a response to growing demand in premium markets

While many Canadian farmers say policies to reduce carbon emissions will make them uncompetitive, Aussie producers are setting ambitious climate mitigation goals to meet international customers’ growing demand for sustainable food. “The (Australian) agriculture industry has really led this and has been pushing for these sorts of policy changes… ” Richard Heath, executive director of


Manure being spread at the NDSU Carrington Research Extension Center.

Troublesome weeds spread through manure

Weed seeds pass unharmed through the digestive tracts of animals such as cattle and sheep

Using some kinds of manure as fertilizer can lead to the spread of noxious and troublesome weeds. “It is a known fact that weed seeds pass unharmed through the digestive tracts of ruminant animals (cattle, sheep),” says Mary Keena, livestock environmental management specialist based at North Dakota State University’s Carrington Research Extension Center. “This means that whatever weed seeds

Canada's Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food Marie-Claude Bibeau.

Opinion: Bibeau missed boat on grain drying

Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food Marie-Claude Bibeau had plenty of time to add grain drying as an eligible exemption under the federal carbon pricing plan, but ruled out doing so last year. Her and her colleagues shouldn’t now be standing in the way of cross-partisan support to address the issue. Let’s recap to see how