GFM Network News


Estimates show about 14 per cent of the 2019 U.S. corn and soybean crops will be unsold when the 2020 harvest begins.

Comment: What we know about corn and soy estimates

This year could shape up to be at least as challenging as 2019 was

The best way to begin a new year is to start with what we know. For example, we know the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) December World Agriculture Supply and Demand Estimate shows that about 14 per cent of the 2019 U.S. corn and soybean crops will be unsold when the 2020 harvest begins next

As the White House openly panders to its rural voters, China, wall or no wall, continues to play the long game.

Comment: U.S. trade policy hits the Great Wall

China plays the long game; United States keeps getting played

Several years ago, when Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist Tom Friedman was asked to choose which rising Asian nation, China or India, he’d bet the farm on, Friedman didn’t hesitate to pick India. The reason, he explained, was that while both nations were on an expressway to the future, India, the world’s largest democracy, had an open

Comment: Telling Canada’s wheat story

New crop mission will promote Canadian durum across the Atlantic Ocean

Have you ever heard of new crop missions? Probably not. Most farmers I’ve talked to over the past couple of months have never heard of them. But they are a critical component of our sales process to our overseas buyers, and this year, I have the privilege of being the farmer on the durum trip.

Despite the real upset the CN Rail strike caused for several sectors, the almost immediate calls to end the strike with back-to-work legislation were premature.

Comment: No politician wins in CN strike

Partisan antics at the expense of farmers won’t play well with Canadians

Elected officials took different approaches to handling the Canadian National Railway strike — but none of them come out of it looking good. When roughly 3,200 yard workers and train conductors represented by the Teamsters Canada Rail Conference walked off the job Nov. 19, they did so in protest of safety concerns. They highlighted issues

Comment: Behind Maple Leaf Foods’ bold call to become carbon neutral

The company is now listening to consumers, not just customers, in an effort to grow

Maple Leaf Foods is not just pretending to be environmentally friendly, it is trying to be a trailblazer. The company has just adopted science-based targets that will help it become the first major agri-food company in the world to be carbon neutral. It’s so un-Canadian to be first, to set a world standard, especially in


Comment: Walking in the shadow of hope

The first obvious sign of the season-long flood is a perfectly level, three-foot-high ring of dried mud on the machine shed’s siding. Nature put it there and, in time, will likely wash it away. Across the road, 100 feet behind a noticeably tilting mailbox, stands the empty, sagging farmhouse of my youth. It sports no

With African swine fever knocking on our door, Canada needs a new deadbolt to protect animal agriculture in the country.

Animal Health Canada: A much-needed new deadbolt for the front door

The core problems facing the governance of animal health policy in Canada… are the fragmentation of authority and responsibilities, the large number of actors inside government and out, and the lack of a streamlined and transparent mechanism for achieving overall coherence in a complex policy area. In short, the system needs to be rationalized. –

Modernization of Crown land access has unleashed the uncertainties of future access and casts doubt for producers regarding future investments.

Comment: On Crown Lands, we get what we ask for

Why is anyone surprised by the recent changes to Crown land allocation?

The Oct. 10 front page of the Manitoba Co-operator read “Feeling Betrayed: Crown land tenants voice opposition” and the article describes a series of events that began at the Manitoba Beef Producers annual general meeting held in Brandon February 2017. A resolution was presented to the convention demanding MBP lobby the provincial government to replace


One group predicts that 371 million acres of U.S. farm- and ranchland will change hands in the next 15 years, roughly translating to four out of every 10 acres.

Comment: Agriculture’s coming heart transplant

A lot of farmland is expected to change hands in the coming years

If government and private estimates are accurate, hundreds of millions of North American farm acres will have new owners in the next 15 years. For example, the National Agricultural Statistics Service, the Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) survey takers and record keepers, predicts that 100 million acres of today’s farmland will be sold by its current