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Man. soybeans progress despite wet start

CNS Canada –– Recent warm weather is helping push Manitoba’s soybean crop into R3 and R4 stages of development in many parts of the province, according to a crop expert.

Some beans could use more rain but for the most part are looking good, said Dennis Lange of Manitoba Agriculture, Food and Rural Development. The R3 stage is when small pods form near the top of the plant; in R4, pods start to fill with seeds.

Moisture-stressed areas of western Manitoba are closer to the R2 and R3 stage, he said.

Although flooding in certain areas has kept some soybeans from going into the ground, those that did go into moisture-stressed areas are making progress.

“Some of the beans are recovering and they are a little bit behind. We’re going to need a good warm period with timely rains to help finish these beans off.”

Speaking to participants of a crop tour last week, Brandon, Man. bean grower Ryan Nevin said his soybean crop had been under standing water for five days due to recent flooding, but has since started to recover.

Nevin said he also believed warm weather would be beneficial through August and early September. He said he hoped this year’s frost would be delayed due to the late planting of the crop.

Lange agreed, saying it would be best for the frost to stay away until at least Sept. 15.

“That would be a good starting point. You need to get to R7, when you see one mature brown pod on the plant. We need to get to that stage before a frost.”

Crops that make it to that point have a better chance of fighting off yield losses than ones that don’t, he said.

Iron deficiency chlorosis made its presence felt in the early going of the season, said Lange, but generally plants have grown out of it.

White mould pressure has also been reduced in recent warm, dry weather, he said.

Statistics Canada’s projection of 1.3 million acres for Canada looked to be roughly on target, he added.

— Dave Sims writes for Commodity News Service Canada, a Winnipeg company specializing in grain and commodity market reporting.

 

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