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Fast running waters replace what was an approach just north of Brandon following intense thunderstorms that brought torrential rains.

After two major storms, Westman farmers are surveying the damage

Torrential rains last week plunged western municipalities 
into states of emergency as flooding wreaked havoc

For Ryan Niven of Rapid City, the overrunning roads, acres upon acres of flooded crops and states of emergency popping up across the region felt a lot like 2014 all over again. “Fortunately, we’re done spraying, so we’re not out trying to make a bunch of ruts right now, but I would say, infrastructure-wise, there’s

Shift in weather complicates sclerotinia decisions

Canola is starting to flower and the canopy is wet, usually a recipe for sclerotinia, but perhaps not this year

Parts of Manitoba have taken a sharp turn from bone dry to very wet since the start of June, and that’s impacting the discussion around sclerotinia. “Because parts of the province have had lots of moisture and lots of humidity, we’re gearing up that it could be a bad sclerotinia season,” Justine Cornelsen of the


Forage producers have a new tool to help them pick and manage their seeding choices.

Forage tool aims to make the perfect match

A new online tool promises to tailor forage choices for a producer’s field conditions and planned use

Developers of a new interactive online tool say it will allow producers to pick and choose the best forage species for their farm. The Saskatchewan Forage Council, along with Beef Cattle Research Council, Alberta Beef, Forage Grazing Centre, federal government, government of B.C., among others, launched Forage U-Pick earlier this month. Why it matters: Forage

As Manitoba farmers take off their first forage cut, a new report offers them hope this crop could soon be more insurable.

Forage insurance review offers hope to producers

Issues with the program prevented widespread adoption, but that could now change

The first word is in on possible forage insurance changes, and it largely reflects concerns voiced by producers. On June 19, Manitoba Agriculture and Resource Development released the findings of the awaited forage insurance review, announced last fall in the wake of critically low hay harvests. The report called for a hard look on how

Farmers are finding a mixed bag during first-cut hay harvest.

First cut hay harvest a mixed bag

Yields are average at best, which is worrying for a sector with exhausted feed stocks and stressed pastures

[UPDATED: July 7, 2020] There won’t be any bumper yields from Manitoba’s first hay cut and, despite storms that have left parts of Manitoba waterlogged last, not everywhere in the province has seen enough rain. June saw the province’s first hay harvests, although most fields cut by the third week of the month were either


Roads south of Brandon on June 29, 2020 show the evidence of being overtopped by floodwaters the previous day.

PHOTOS: Water over WestMan

Based on the 30-year average, Manitoba Agriculture pegs the “climate normal” accumulated precipitation for what are typically the wettest months of the year — May, June and July — at 205 millimetres for the areas around Brandon, Rivers and Minnedosa. In the stretch of 2020 from June 28 into Canada Day, those areas received three

Floodwaters claim the main road access to the Brandon Municipal Airport on June 29, 2020.

Floodwaters rise in western Manitoba

WEATHER: Areas in and north of Brandon were particularly hard hit by intense storms that rolled through June 29.

Severe thunderstorms June 28 have left patches of western Manitoba fighting desperately to keep their heads above water. Areas around Brandon, Rapid City and north towards Riding Mountain National Park reported widespread flooding June 28-29. Brandon airport reported 155 millimetres of rain in a matter of hours, according to Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC),

Crops struggle to emerge through hardened soils in Manitoba’s clay-soil regions this spring.

Crops look to come from behind after dry start

Soil compaction and soil crusting led to emergence problems earlier this season, although more recent rains have loosened things up and crops are reportedly coming on

On camera, the soil chunk dug up in eastern Manitoba in mid-June might as well have been cement, for all the damage it showed after being hit with a screwdriver. The video, filmed by agronomy consulting service Antara Agronomy and later posted to Twitter, shows a local agronomist attempting to smash and chip a block of compacted seedbed,


Windy weather puts the brakes on spraying

A delayed spring left less room for pre-seed herbicide. Then the wind picked up

High winds may have left producers with bigger weeds than they would like. Winds were enough to cause some sandblasting damage in Manitoba’s young crops in late May and early June. Weather stations in Carman reported wind gusts near or above 50 kilometres an hour in the first two weeks of June, with some days clocking gusts of

Manitoba’s pork sector continues to grapple with many questions and few answers as it navigates the ‘new normal.’

Pork sector still facing uncertain landscape

The effects of market disruption from COVID-19 and plant closures has yet to dissipate, leaving many questions for the sector

The hog market is starting its rebound with news that previously plugged value chains are once again starting to move — but the sector has a long climb ahead. Bill Alford, general manager of Hams Marketing, noted that U.S. processors previously shut down due to COVID-19 are once again ramping up operations, although the backlog of market-ready hogs held