GFM Network News


Manitoba no closer to new beef-processing capacity

The industry has long desired more slaughter and processing capacity here at home, but despite decades of hoping, nothing is on the horizon

It’s an intermittent thorn in the side for Manitoba beef producers. Lack of local processing capacity is a popular topic among the sector, one that has cropped up time and time again for decades, and one that gains particular traction when, like now, the market turns sour. Why it matters: Processing issues out of Alberta

An elevator at Solsgirth was built in 1961 by National Grain. Sold to Cargill Grain in 1975, the elevator and its annexes were destroyed by fire on December 16, 1981, shortly after undergoing an extensive renovation costing some $750,000. It was replaced by a new composite-style elevator constructed in mid-1982. Traded to Manitoba Pool in June 1995, the elevator was closed by Agricore United in 2002. It is now used for private grain storage.

PHOTOS: This Old Elevator: October 2019

In the 1950s, there were over 700 grain elevators in Manitoba. Today, there are fewer than 200. You can help to preserve the legacy of these disappearing “Prairie sentinels.” The Manitoba Historical Society (MHS) is gathering information about all elevators that ever stood in Manitoba, regardless of their present status. Collaborating with the Manitoba Co-operator it is supplying these


Virden Hargrave Pool: An elevator one mile northwest of Virden was built between 1977 and 1978 by Manitoba Pool, replacing a smaller elevator in town. The 110,000-bushel facility was one of the first modern “high-throughput” composite designs, featuring twin metal legs, a digital scale, and exposed spouts on top. Dubbed “Virden Hargrave” for the area it would serve, the elevator was barely 24 years old when it was closed by Agricore United in February 2002, then used for private grain storage until around 2013.

PHOTOS: This Old Elevator: August 2019

In the 1950s, there were over 700 grain elevators in Manitoba. Today, there are fewer than 200. You can help to preserve the legacy of these disappearing “Prairie sentinels.” The Manitoba Historical Society (MHS) is gathering information about all elevators that ever stood in Manitoba, regardless of their present status. Collaborating with the Manitoba Co-operator it is supplying these

The first Manitoba Pool elevator at Goodlands was built in 1928 and renovated in 1971. Eleven years later, the Pool “A” elevator at Deloraine (built in 1949) and a crib annex from the elevator at the nearby siding of Dalny were moved to its west side. Three steel tanks replaced the original elevator in 1985. The CP railway line was abandoned in 1996 and the elevator was closed in 2000. It is now used for private grain storage.

PHOTOS: This Old Elevator: July 2019

The Manitoba Historical Society wants to gather information about all the grain elevators in Manitoba

In the 1950s, there were over 700 grain elevators in Manitoba. Today, there are fewer than 200. You can help to preserve the legacy of these disappearing “Prairie sentinels.” The Manitoba Historical Society (MHS) is gathering information about all elevators that ever stood in Manitoba, regardless of their present status. Collaborating with the Manitoba Co-operator it is supplying these

This steep cliff face near Cartwright allowed human hunters on foot to harvest the massive bison herds of the central plains.

Visit Manitoba’s buffalo jumps

Other sights on the western Prairies are more famous, but don’t miss this slice of Indigenous history closer to home

Perhaps you have heard about the famous attraction in southwestern Alberta called Head-Smashed-In Buffalo Jump — but were you aware that Manitoba has similar sites? In the southern part of our province, just north of the village of Cartwright, is the Clay Banks Buffalo Jump. Many years ago, when bison still roamed these vast stretches


Daly House Museum curator Eileen Trott shows off colourful reproductions of historic McKenzie Seed catalogue covers.

The seed company that grew Brandon

An exhibit at Brandon’s Daly House tells the story of McKenzie Seeds’ agricultural roots 
and breakout into the domestic seed market

A Brandon exhibit is taking folks back to the city’s boom-town days through one of the companies that grew the city — and brightened its gardens. The “Imagining Summer Gardens: Images from the A.E. McKenzie Visual Archive” exhibit at Daly House Museum tells the story of A.E. McKenzie, and his company’s rise to be one

At the time of this 1964 photo, there were two elevators at Mather. The Manitoba Pool elevator at left was built in 1926. The balloon annexes on each side of it were replaced in 1969 by a single crib annex. Renovated in 1971 and 1986, it closed on December 31, 1996 and was demolished. The United Grain Growers elevator at right dated from 1917. A 1971 trade saw it become Manitoba Pool’s B elevator for five years, closing in 1976.

PHOTOS: This Old Elevator: June 2019

The Manitoba Historical Society wants to gather information about all the grain elevators in Manitoba

In the 1950s, there were over 700 grain elevators in Manitoba. Today, there are fewer than 200. You can help to preserve the legacy of these disappearing “Prairie sentinels.” The Manitoba Historical Society (MHS) is gathering information about all elevators that ever stood in Manitoba, regardless of their present status. Collaborating with the Manitoba Co-operator it is supplying these

Jeff and Sheila Elder with their red, “Eaton’s barn,” which stands just north of Wawanesa, Manitoba.

Preserving vanishing Prairie barns a difficult row to hoe

One Wawanesa-area family has already sunk thousands of dollars into saving their heritage barns but fear the structures will succumb to the elements

A barn sits in a barley field, gambrel roofed, stained with red iron oxide. It could be one of dozens scattered over the more than two-hour drive from Winnipeg to Wawanesa, but to Sheila and Jeff Elder, this one is special. On the peak facing the road, it says “Maplegrove Farm 1913” in big white


An elevator at Domain was built in 1928 by Manitoba Pool Elevators. Nine years later, a collapsing foundation forced it to close until repairs could be made. Initially rated with a 40,000-bushel capacity, it was enlarged with temporary balloon annexes in 1951 then with a 60,000-bushel, 18-bin crib annex in 1966. The facility was fully renovated in 1992. Closed by Agricore in 2001, it was sold into private ownership that oversaw the addition of two steel tanks on its north side.

PHOTOS: This Old Elevator: May 2019

The Manitoba Historical Society wants to gather information about all the grain elevators in Manitoba

In the 1950s, there were over 700 grain elevators in Manitoba. Today, there are fewer than 200. You can help to preserve the legacy of these disappearing “Prairie sentinels.” The Manitoba Historical Society (MHS) is gathering information about all elevators that ever stood in Manitoba, regardless of their present status. Collaborating with the Manitoba Co-operator it is supplying these

View from Fort Ellice site.

Visit the site of old Fort Ellice

A good destination for birdwatchers and those interested in history

For history buffs and keen birders, an interesting spot to visit is the site of old Fort Ellice, southwest of St. Lazare, Manitoba. This area is also part of the Ellice-Archie and Spy Hill Community Pasture, formerly PFRA (Prairie Farm Rehabilitation Administration), that straddles the Manitoba-Saskatchewan border. It was recently included as part of Manitoba’s