GFM Network News


Robert Gikunda trains Mary Karimi, a project participant, on how to use smartphones for data collection at a hotel in Mukothima, Tharaka Nithi County, Kenya on October 2, 2020.

Recovery will be a long haul, says Canadian Foodgrains Bank

In the midst of deepening worldwide need, Canadian donors stepped up

For some families in countries without social safety nets, surviving the COVID-19 pandemic has forced them to eat less or sell assets that might have helped them recover, says the Canadian Foodgrains Bank. “The numbers of people who will be experiencing hunger are going up,” said Musu Taylor-Lewis, director of resources and public engagement at

Jim Cornelius visits with Victoria Loki and her baby, Cecilia, in South Sudan in 2015.

Always on mission

Outgoing Canadian Foodgrains Bank executive director Jim Cornelius reflects on a career of international development

The food aid was two months late. Niger was in the grip of drought and for many complicated reasons, the food aid the Canadian Foodgrains Bank had ordered had not reached the village Jim Cornelius was visiting that morning. He sat under a tree with a woman and her child. As she told him they


African farmers disrupted by COVID will benefit from funds from the Canadian government. The Canadian Foodgrains Bank says such help is sorely needed.

Federal funds to help African farmers

The $3-million program will focus on supporting small-scale farmers hit hard by COVID-19 disruptions

New funding from the federal government will support small-scale farmers in Africa, the Canadian Foodgrains Bank announced September 3. “The small-scale farmers we work with in developing countries have been significantly impacted by COVID-19 prevention methods,” said outgoing Foodgrains Bank executive director Jim Cornelius in a news release. “Drastic efforts to reduce the spread of

Members of the BMW growing project in 
Boissevain plan this year’s crop via Zoom meeting.

Foodgrains Bank bringing food aid to locked-down families

Manitoba growing projects preparing to plant as fundraising becomes crucial

Canadian Foodgrains Bank growing projects in Manitoba are preparing to plant as usual despite the complications of COVID-19. These fundraisers will be more crucial than ever, as a worldwide health crisis quickly is becoming a food crisis, the organization says. “The situation is very dire. Families can’t last more than a few more weeks like

Bergmann (centre, in black shirt) with Foodgrains Bank staff on a tour in India.

Local farmer witnesses effects of agriculture training on food security

‘Mind-blowing’ learning trip to agriculture projects in India got Will Bergmann thinking about how to help closer to home

Will Bergmann is a foodie, so when his hosts in a remote Indian village began cooking, it just made sense to join in. Bergmann, a farmer and restaurateur from Glenlea, watched a group of men lift a metal bowl, about three feet across, onto an outdoor clay oven. As one man fed the fire with


The Arborg growing project harvested 75 acres of wheat on September 9 with six combines and one swather. The project yielded 4,175 bushels, raising just over $25,000, said a spokesperson from the Canadian Foodgrains Bank.

Foodgrains Bank fundraising fields still waiting for harvest

Other growing projects saw excellent yields, which may even out donations

Several Canadian Foodgrains Bank growing projects are struggling to get their crops in, said Manitoba representative Gordon Janzen on Oct. 22. “Its been a tough harvest season and we feel for all those farmers who haven’t been able to complete harvest yet,” said Janzen. At the time, the Foodgrains Bank had seven projects with around

A panel discussion followed the premiere of “Common Strength.” Pictured (left to right): Carol Thiessen, Colleen Dyck, Meagan Silencieux, Theresa Rempel Mulaire.

Documentary explores women farmers’ role in ending hunger

‘Common Strength’ shows Kenyan farm life through the eyes of a ‘fish out of water’ Manitoba woman

Documentary “Common Strength,” exploring how empowering women farmers frees them to feed their families and flourish in their communities, debuted in Winnipeg on October 15. “If we’re not talking about women in agriculture, we’re missing a huge swath of women,” said Carol Thiessen, senior policy adviser with the Canadian Foodgrains Bank, which sponsored the film. Why

Farmers, agronomists, and people with an interest in global soil health met in Carman July 25 and 26 to discuss the challenges of protecting soil.

Carman event serves up common ground on soil health practices

Canadian and African agronomists shared perspectives on conservation agriculture at a recent Canadian Foodgrains Bank forum

Jocelyn Velestuk stood in front of the research station classroom filled with people and confessed to an addiction of sorts. “I am obsessed with soil,” the Saskatchewan farmer and agronomist told her audience. “I even had a mud-themed birthday party when I was young,” she said in a later interview. “The first soil science class


VIDEO: Soil stewardship event digs into soil health

Foodgrains forum on soil conservation takes centre stage at Ian N. Morrison Research farm in Carman

Manitoba Co-operator reporter Geralyn Wichers talks with Dr. Francis Zvumoya (above) from the University of Manitoba’s Soil Science Department about soil degradation across the globe and what people in Manitoba are doing to support soil stewardship. Manitoba Co-operator reporter Geralyn Wichers talks with James Kornelson, Public Engagement Coordinator for the Canadian Foodgrains Bank about its

Colleen (r) and Lucy take a walk on her farm in Kenya.

Niverville farmer featured in documentary about reducing hunger

Colleen Dyck travelled halfway around the world to meet a Kenyan farmer who is teaching agricultural skills to women in her community

A Manitoba farmer will star in a documentary about the impact of empowering women farmers around the world. “It was quite incredible,” said Colleen Dyck, who farms with her husband and four children near Niverville. “I feel like I got this university education in like two weeks.” This spring, Dyck spent eight days with a