GFM Network News


A myriad of factors have likely contributed to keeping infection numbers down so far this year.

Why are Manitoba’s PED numbers so low?

Spring weather, residual immunity, biosecurity awareness and efforts to avoid COVID-19 may have all played into keeping Manitoba’s porcine epidemic diarrhea numbers down

It’s been a good year so far for PED in Manitoba’s hog barns. The province has had only two cases of porcine epidemic diarrhea (PED) this year; one in the northeast and one in southeast Manitoba, both in nursery barns confirmed June 10. This is in comparison to 60 cases by July 22 last year,

‘Weak positive’ PED turns up in Alberta sample

A “weak positive” finding of the porcine epidemic diarrhea (PED) virus from ongoing sampling in Alberta offers a warning that the hog disease may not have yet left the province alone. The chief provincial veterinarian’s office (OCPV) on Monday reported that the agriculture department’s lab in Edmonton on Jan. 22 found a weak PED positive


Manitoba hog producers outside the core PEDv area need to reconsider their biosecurity measures to keep the disease at bay.

No rolling the dice on PED says Manitoba Pork Council

PEDv has broken into both central and northeastern Manitoba, and barns in newly impacted areas might not be ready for the threat

Barns dodging PED might owe that to luck rather than robust bio­security. Andrew Dickson, the Manitoba Pork Council’s general manager, warns that some barns outside southeast Manitoba will need to heighten their guard if they hope to repel a serious risk of the disease. “We’ve got odd stories of people saying, ‘Well I’ve never got

Ranchers inundated by floodwaters

Our History: June 2013

In a series of years starting in 1999, Manitoba’s southwest corner was again hit by excess moisture in 2013. The front page of our July 11 issue featured a photo of cattle along the swollen Maple Creek near Reston. The area had received as much as 15 inches of rain in the previous two weeks,

“There certainly could be risk factors that they maybe didn’t fully address last time around, but in many cases you’re also looking at larger farms in swine-dense areas and those in themselves are risk factors.” – Dr. Glen Duizer, Manitoba CVO.

Another 2017 for PEDv?

Manitoba’s CVO says the carry-over of 2017 is lasting longer than expected

It’s shaping up to be another bad year for PEDv in the province’s pork sector. In fact the province says it could easily be on par with 2017, the province’s worst year. On June 18, Dr. Glen Duizer of Manitoba’s Chief Veterinary Office (CVO) said 2019 cases were comparable to the same point in time


About 53 per cent of all hog farmers in Manitoba are currently signed on with the disease reporting program.

Manitoba Pork pushing online disease response program as PEDv cases climb

Participation in the Manitoba Co-ordinated Disease Response program has grown to 79 per cent in the southeast

The Manitoba Pork Council is hoping to get the final few southeastern hog producers signed on to the first line of defence against PEDv. About 79 per cent of those producers have signed on with the council’s Manitoba Co-ordinated Disease Response program (MCDR). The online information-sharing platform includes information on biosecurity, manure spreading and outbreak

Quebec books new PED outbreak

A weanling operation in Quebec’s Monteregie is home to the province’s first new case of porcine epidemic diarrhea (PED) in almost four years. The provincial agriculture ministry confirmed the new case Friday, marking Quebec’s first since May 2015 and its 17th since the disease first appeared in the province in February 2014. The Monteregie, the

Alberta confirms fourth PED outbreak

Alberta took another punch last week in its fight with porcine epidemic diarrhea (PED), having confirmed the province’s fourth on-farm case of the disease. Officials with the provincial ag department and Alberta Pork haven’t said where the fourth case is located, nor how far it is from the three southern Alberta properties where outbreaks in


A new algorithm can help tell pork producers a PEDv outbreak may be imminent.

Researchers create algorithm to predict PEDv outbreaks

The high-tech approach already has an 80 per cent accuracy rate

Researchers from North Carolina State University have developed an algorithm that could give pig producers advance notice of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDv) outbreaks. The proof-of-concept algorithm has potential for use in real-time prediction of other disease outbreaks in food animals. PEDv is a virus that causes high mortality rates in preweaned piglets. The virus