GFM Network News


Potato producers have been spared sights like this in 2020, although yields may have fallen short of what many producers would have liked.

Smooth harvest, but short yield for potato growers

Manitoba won’t see the undug acres of 2018 and 2019, although many yields aren’t bursting any storages

Manitoba’s potato crop won’t be breaking yield records. Then again, at least the crop is off the field. It has not been the case for the last two years. Producers were forced to abandon a significant portion of their crop in both 2018 and 2019 due to wet falls and damage from frost. Last year,

The downturn has come as an abrupt shift from expected demand for Manitoba potatoes.

COVID-19 puts the brakes on potato acres

The potato sector is bracing for long-term impacts as the COVID-19 pandemic shrinks demand

Manitoba’s potato acres will take a hit this year in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic and plummeting demand. According to multiple industry sources, McCain Foods has dropped 16 per cent of acres from its contracts with Manitoba farmers, while Simplot has also made smaller cuts from its agreements. Why it matters: As demands shrinks,


Potato growers struggled with waterlogged fields this fall. Now those problems are coming home to roost.

Another winter of headaches for potato growers

Unharvested acres were already more than double last year’s historically hard harvest, now some of that crop is rotting in the pile

Manitoba potato growers are facing the inevitable result of a second extremely challenging digging season — elevated losses in storage. Wet weather in September and early October kept producers out of the fields, while a three-day snowstorm over the Thanksgiving weekend dropped upwards of 75 centimetres of snow in areas of south-central Manitoba, followed by

Producers were reporting storage concerns this winter as they struggled with frost-damaged potatoes and extreme cold.

Potato sector not stressing on seed, despite tight supplies

Last year’s tough harvest means tight seed supplies in the run-up to the Simplot expansion opening

Manitoba’s potato sector is gearing up to supply an expanding industry but seed supplies will be tight after a tough harvest last season. J.R. Simplot’s $460-million expansion of its Portage la Prairie plant is expected to double the operation’s need for tubers when it comes online this fall. Why it matters: Manitoba’s potato sector is

Manitoba potato growers say a wet and cold fall is causing issues with storages this winter.

Spud growers battling storage woes

A wet and cold fall saw some potatoes dug and stored at less than optimal conditions

A tough harvest is translating into a challenging storage season for Manitoba potato growers. It’s especially frustrating because growers were looking at a bumper crop, forecast to be the third-largest harvest on record. But they were denied that by rains that delayed harvest and hard frosts that hit in mid-October causing ground to freeze as


Potato growers battling storage woes

Potato growers battling storage woes

A wet and cold fall saw some potatoes dug and stored at less than optimal conditions

A tough harvest is translating into a challenging storage season for Manitoba potato growers. It’s especially frustrating because growers were looking at a bumper crop, forecast to be the third largest harvest on record. But they were denied that by rains that delayed harvest and hard frosts that hit in mid-October causing ground to freeze


It was a tough growing season and potato harvest but in the end, growers saw good yields.

Good potato yields despite challenging year

A dry summer required a lot of irrigation 
and was followed by a dry fall that 
delayed digging

Many Manitoba potato growers faced nail-biting times this autumn as they struggled to get the crop off. In the end, however, yields are expected to be similar to last year. Dave Sawatzky, manager of Keystone Potato Producers Association, said he predicts yields will roughly be on par or slightly better than 2016’s harvest, when Manitoba


Pink rot can mean significant storage losses, and a key control product is under threat from resistance.

Canadian potato growers may lose Ridomil for pink rot

Phosphites offer growers a strong alternative control option for pink rot

Canadian potato growers may be destined to lose the use of Ridomil to control pink rot. The issue is most serious in Prince Edward Island, where observers say the active ingredient metalaxyl is on the verge of being rendered ineffective. To some degree it is a looming problem across the country, according to a recent

potato crop

Manitoba potato acreage seen steady in 2015

Demand for processing potatoes is stable to up slightly in North America

It’s too early to make definitive statements about potato acreage in Manitoba in 2015, but Keystone Potato Producers Association manager Dan Sawatzky expects that if anything, it may go up slightly. “I think we’re pretty confident that we can say that,” he says. In 2014, Manitoba acreage totalled 63,340 acres, of which 45,000 were processing,