GFM Network News





Mature lesions caused by common bacterial blight in dry beans.

June winds add to risk of bacterial blight

Some bean, oat, pea crops in Manitoba showing bacterial infections Add bacterial blight to the problems Manitoba producers are fighting this year. Agronomists have noted blight issues in a number of crops, such as oats, dry beans, and some concern in peas, according to provincial crop pathologist David Kaminski. Why it matters: Producers misdiagnosing bacterial

(Peggy Greb photo courtesy ARS/USDA)

Pulse weekly outlook: Manitoba dry beans in good shape

MarketsFarm — Despite temperatures ranging from near-freezing lows to sweltering highs and receiving little precipitation, Manitoba’s dry edible bean crop has weathered the conditions well, according to the province’s pulse specialist. “We’ve had some interesting weather over the last week to two weeks,” Dennis Lange, pulse specialist for Manitoba Agriculture at Altona, said, referring to

File photo of a pea crop south of Ethelton, Sask. on Aug. 1, 2019. (Dave Bedard photo)

Pulse weekly outlook: Peas, beans hold up in dry Manitoba

MarketsFarm — Of the pulses being planted in Manitoba this spring, field peas and dry beans appear the best able to handle the difficult drought conditions the province continues to experience throughout its growing areas. Field peas “have a relatively low water requirement, similar to dry beans,” Cassandra Tkachuk, production specialist with Manitoba Pulse and


File photo of a pea crop south of Ethelton, Sask. on Aug. 1, 2019. (Dave Bedard photo)

Pulse weekly outlook: StatsCan’s pea, chickpea acres short of trade expectations

MarketsFarm — Numbers were seen as disappointing for dry peas and chickpeas in Statistics Canada’s survey-based principal field crop planting projections released Tuesday. The federal agency predicted 3.839 million acres seeded for dry peas nationwide, nearly a 10 per cent decline compared to last year. By comparison, MarketsFarm projected 4.38 million acres while Agriculture and

A view from Globeways Canada’s office at Mississauga, Ont., from a 2011 video marking the presentation of the Mississauga Board of Trade’s award for Small Business of the Year. (MBOT video screengrab via YouTube)

Pulse packers’ security covers cash owed to farmers

Sales of Globeways plants in Manitoba, Saskatchewan now approved

More than 50 farmers who were owed money for deliveries to Prairie pulse and special crop processors Canpulse Foods and Global Grain Canada are expected to get what they’re owed, as both companies’ assets move to new ownership. Canpulse, Global Grain Canada and their parent company Globeways Canada went into receivership last Nov. 19, following

Farmers recently lined up at Global Grain’s Plum Coulee facility to retrieve their edible beans.

Farmers retrieve beans from Global Grain in wake of insolvency

That will cut the amount of security money needed to cover what farmers are owed

Many farmers who were owned by Global Grain Canada of Plum Coulee have gotten their goods back. The Canadian Grain Commission (CGC) is still tallying how much farmers are owed, but CGC spokesman Remi Gosselin said in an interview Nov. 20 that figure has come down as physical stocks of edible beans are returned to


Beyond Meat’s ‘latest iteration’ of its Beyond Burger gets to carry a Made in Canada label. (Photo courtesy Beyond Meat via Globe Newswire)

Beyond Meat lines up Canadian patty co-packer

U.S. company launches 'latest iteration' of burger line

One of the names tied closest to the plant protein-based meat substitute sector has enlisted an unnamed Quebec operation to make its beef-similar patties for the Canadian retail market. Los Angeles-based Beyond Meat on Wednesday launched the “latest iteration” of its flagship Beyond Burger, billed as “produced locally at a co-manufacturing facility in Canada” and

Pinto beans. (Scott Bauer photo courtesy ARS/USDA)

Pulse weekly outlook: Manitoba edible beans look good for now

Bean growers watching weather

MarketsFarm — Edible bean crops in Manitoba remain in generally good shape in mid-July, with early indications pointing to solid production on the year. “Overall, they look pretty good,” said Dennis Lange, provincial pulse specialist with Manitoba Agriculture, on the state of dry edible bean crops. The crops had struggled with wind damage early on