Nine new CWRS wheats recommended for registration

Sixteen of the 36 cultivars reviewed were automatically endorsed

A record 36 cultivars sought the Prairie Recommending Committee for Wheat, Rye and Triticale’s support for registration at the committee’s annual meeting here Feb. 23 to 26.

The committee of experts representing the grain industry from breeders and farmers to seed companies, marketers and end-users, assesses new cultivars to see if they meet the agronomic, disease, and in the case of milling wheats, end-use quality requirements of their intended class. If they do, the committee recommends that the Canadian Food Inspection Agency register them — a prerequisite to commercialization.

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Once registered the Canadian Grain Commission (CGC) assigns the new cultivars to their appropriate class.

Thirty-two of the 36 cultivars presented were recommended for registration, three were not recommended because they failed to meet the requirements for their intended class and one was withdrawn by its breeder.

  • Of the 36 cultivars, 32 were wheats, three were ryes and one was a triticale.
  • Of the 32 wheats, 25 were up for full registration; 22 were recommended, two were rejected and one was withdrawn.
  • Of the seven wheats seeking a three-year interim registration, six were recommended and one was rejected.
  • There were 12 Canada Western Red Spring (CWRS) wheats seeking full registration; nine were recommended, two were rejected and one was withdrawn.
  • Of the 28 cultivars seeking full registration, 16 were endorsed by the committee automatically. That’s because all three evaluation teams — agronomy, disease and quality — which meet separately before the whole committee meets, supported the cultivars for registration.
  • Of the 11 that were voted on because one or more evaluation team turned thumbs down, two were rejected — both in the CWRS class.
  • Of the 12 wheats presented in the CWRS class, one was withdrawn, three were automatically endorsed and eight went to a vote. Of those eight six were endorsed and two were rejected.

The evaluation teams vote by a show of hands after reviewing data on each cultivar, but the committee as a whole casts their ballots secretly.

The PRCWRT has 23 voting members. Non-members, including reporters, can attend the PRCWRT’s annual meeting, but only after getting the committee chair’s permission.

Here’s a list of cultivars recommended for full registration. Some of the information below was supplied by the breeders and some is from what was presented at the meeting:

Canada Western Red Spring (CWRS) wheat

1) BW496 is intended for the Canada Western Red Spring (CWRS) class and was developed by Francis Kirigwi at Syngenta. It’s intended for Manitoba and eastern Saskatchewan offering a competitive yield and end-use quality. The disease evaluation team didn’t endorse it because it is susceptible to bunt — intermediate resistance is a minimum requirement. But in a secret ballot the committee voted to recommend it for registration.

2) BW963 is an awnless, high-yield, solid-stem line intended for the CWRS class and suited for growing areas prone to wheat stem sawfly from Richard Cuthbert at Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada’s Semiarid Prairie Agricultural Research Centre at Swift Current, Sask. It yielded 20 per cent higher than Lillian in trials with similar plant height and straw strength. Test weight and kernel weight is significantly higher than Lillian. It matures two days later than Lillian and one day earlier than Carberry. It has much lower fusarium head blight symptoms than Lillian and is resistant to prevalent races of leaf rust, stem rust and stripe rust while being moderately resistant to common bunt, loose smut.

3) BW965 is a high-yielding, awned, semi-dwarf doubled-haploid line with short strong straw intended for the CWRS class from Richard Cuthbert at Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada’s Semiarid Prairie Agricultural Research Centre at Swift Current, Sask. It yielded almost 11 per cent higher than the checks and almost four per cent higher than Carberry with comparable protein. It’s almost four centimetres shorter on average than Carberry and has very good lodging resistance. Maturity is similar to Carberry. It’s rated intermediate for fusarium head blight. Deoxynivalenol (DON) scores are similar to Carberry. It shows resistance to stem rust and stripe rust, moderate resistance to leaf rust and common bunt. It was rated moderately resistant to susceptible to loose smut. It has low flour ash, improved gluten strength with good extensibility.

4) BW966 is a high-yielding, awned, semi-dwarf doubled-haploid line intended for the CWRS class from Richard Cuthbert at Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada’s Semiarid Prairie Agricultural Research Centre at Swift Current, Sask. It yielded 15 per cent higher than the checks and eight per cent higher than Carberry. When compared to Unity, the highest-yielding check, over 25 site years, BW966 had almost four per cent more yield, plus 0.3 more units of whole grain protein. It’s about three centimetres shorter than Glenn with similar resistance to lodging. It matures about three days earlier than Carberry and is similar to Unity. Test weight is higher than Carberry and slightly less than Glenn. Kernel weight is similar to Carberry. It’s fusarium head blight resistance rating is intermediate with lower levels of deoxynivalenol (DON) accumulation. It’s resistant to leaf rust, stem rust, stripe rust and loose smut and rated intermediate to common bunt. Its quality is within the range of the checks with noted improvements of farinograph absorption and clean flour yield during testing in 2012 and/or 2013.

5) BW971 is a unique cultivar resistant to midge and sawfly, intended for the CWRS class and developed by Pierre Hucl of the University of Saskatchewan’s Crop Development centre. It yielded above the checks. Maturity, height and straw strength were within the range of the checks. Test and kernel weight was higher than the checks. Grain protein was poorer than the checks. It has very good milling qualities. The disease evaluation team rejected it because it failed to meet the minimum requirements for leaf rust and bunt, although it was close to meeting the leaf rust requirement. The committee as a whole voted to recommend it for registration.

6) PT472 is an early-maturing variety with high yield potential and good milling qualities intended for the CWRS class, developed by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada and represented at the committee by new wheat breeder Andrew Burt who is based at the Brandon Research Centre. It’s suited to be grown in Western Canada’s Parkland region, which has a shorter growing season. Although it was recommended for registration the disease evaluation team did not endorse it because it didn’t meet the minimum tolerance for fusarium head blight. The committee as a whole voted to recommend it for regsitration.

7) PT474 is an early-maturing variety with high yield potential intended for the CWRS class for the Parkland region, developed by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada and represented at the committee by new wheat breeder Andrew Burt who is based at the Brandon Research Centre. It has high test weight, excellent flour yield, good gluten strength and matures about 1.5 days earlier than CDC Teal. It yielded almost seven per cent higher than CDC Teal, eight per cent more than AC Splendor, and two per cent higher than CDC Osler.
The quality evaluation team didn’t endorse it because of its low extensibility, but the committee as a whole voted to recommend it for registration.

8) PT588 is intended for the CWRS class and was developed by Pierre Hucl of the University of Saskatchewan’s Crop Development Centre. It was endorsed by all three evaluation teams and therefore automatically recommended for registration. A summary of PT588’s attributes was not available when this was posted.

9) PT772 is intended for the CWRS class and suited to the Parkland region. It was developed by Dean Spanner, a wheat breeder at the University of Alberta. It was not endorsed by the disease evaluation team because it’s susceptible to bunt. To counter that Spanner said the seed should be treated. It’s higher yielding than CDC Teal and yields the same as AC Spendor and CDC Osler. It’s early maturing with good test weight and good milling and baking properties. The committee as a whole voted to recommend it for registration.

Canada Prairie Spring (Red) (CSP) wheat

10) HY537 is a red Canadian Prairie Spring wheat developed by Curtis Pozniak, a wheat breeder at the University of Saskatchewan’s Crop Development Centre. It was endorsed by all three evaluation teams and therefore automatically recommended for registration. A summary of its attributes was not available when this was posted.

11) HY1627 is a red Canada Prairie Spring wheat suitable for Western Canada developed by Harpinder Randhawa at Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada’s Lethbridge Research Centre. It matures one day earlier than 5700PR and is equal to Conquer and AAC Foray. It has excellent straw strength, is significantly shorter than Conquer and AAC Foray and has good resistance to all three rusts — leaf, stem and stripe. The disease evaluation team did not endorse it because it’s susceptible to bunt, but the committee as a whole voted to recommend it for registration.

12) HY1632 is a red Canada Prairie Spring wheat suitable for Western Canada developed by Harpinder Randhawa at Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada’s Lethbridge Research Centre. It yields three per cent than the checks (5700PR, Conquer, AAC Foray) and is consistently higher yielding in Zones 1 and 4. It matures one day earlier than 5700PR, equal to Conquer and AAC Foray. It has excellent straw strength, is significantly shorter than Conquer and AAC Foray and has good resistance to all three rusts (leaf, stem and stripe) and loose smut.

Canada Western Hard White Spring (CWHWS) wheat

13) HW037 is intended for the Canada Western Hard White Spring wheat class. It was developed by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada and represented at the committee by new wheat breeder Andrew Burt, based at the Brandon Research Centre. It has improved yield and protein concentration as compared to Whitehawk and Snowstar and yields similarly to AAC Iceberg with similar protein concentrations. It is moderately resistant to leaf rust, stem rust, and stripe rust and has improved tolerance to fusarium head blight and lower DON content compared to AAC Iceberg. Its lodging scores are slightly higher than the checks and it is moderately susceptible to common bunt. It yields almost three per cent higher than Whitehawk, and Snowstar.

14) HW616 is high yielding, has high protein and is intended for the Canada Western Hard White Spring wheat class. It was developed by Pierre Hucl of the University of Saskatchewan’s Crop Development Centre. While it has lower flour yield it has good dough strength. The quality evaluation team did not endorse the cultivar because of concerns over its end-use quality, but the committee as whole voted to recommend it for registration.

Soft White Spring (SWS) wheat

15) SWS433 is intended for the Soft White Spring class and is suited for Western Canada. It was developed by Harpinder Randhawa at Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada’s Lethbridge Research Centre. It yields six and three per cent more than AC Andrew and Sadash, respectively. It yields consistently well under irrigation and on dry land. It has excellent straw strength and larger kernels than AC Andrew and Sadash. It has good resistance to stripe rust, loose smut and powdery mildew and an improved falling number. Maturity is equal to AC Andrew, and Sadash. It is slightly taller than AC Andrew and Sadash (two cm). It’s susceptible to fusarium head blight, and common bunt.

Canada Western Amber durum (CWAD) wheat

16) DT577 is intended for the Canada Western Amber durum wheat class and was developed by Curtis Pozniak, a wheat breeder at the University of Saskatchewan’s Crop Development Centre. It was endorsed by all three evaluation teams and therefore automatically recommended for registration. A summary of its attributes was not available when this was posted.

17) DT578 is intended for the Canada Western Amber durum wheat class and was developed by Curtis Pozniak, a wheat breeder at the University of Saskatchewan’s Crop Development Centre. It was endorsed by all three evaluation teams and therefore automatically recommended for registration. A summary of its attributes was not available when this was posted.

18) DT579 is intended for the Canada Western Amber durum wheat class and was developed by Curtis Pozniak, a wheat breeder at the University of Saskatchewan’s Crop Development Centre. It was endorsed by all three evaluation teams and therefore automatically recommended for registration. A summary of its attributes was not available when this was posted.

19) DT856 is intended for the Canada Western Amber durum wheat class and was developed by Ron De Pauw at Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada’s Semiarid Prairie Agricultural Research Centre at Swift Current, Sask. It is a high-yielding durum wheat with low cadmium uptake and good quality. It yielded 21 per cent more than AC Navigator, eight per cent more than Strongfield and two per cent more than AAC Cabri. It yielded three per cent more than Brigade, the highest-yielding check and had 0.5 more units of whole grain protein. It matures one day later than Strongfield and two days earlier than Brigade. It is shorter than Brigade and AAC Cabri. Straw strength is similar to Strongfield. Test weight is higher than Strongfield and AC Navigator. Kernel size is very slightly smaller than all of the checks. It is resistant to leaf, stem and stripe rust and its common bunt reaction is similar to Strongfield. Leaf spot reaction was within the range of the checks. It is moderately susceptible to fusarium head blight and similar to Strongfield and AAC Cabribut and more resistant than AC Navigator. It has low grain cadmium concentration similar to Strongfield and its quality profile meets the requirements of the CWAD class with noted improvement in semolina ash and high pasta yellowness.

Canada Western Red Winter (CWRW) wheat

20) W512 is intended for the Canada Western Red Winter wheat class combining significantly higher grain yield than all of the checks with very good winter survival, late maturity (similar to Radiant), medium height, excellent lodging resistance, high seed mass, and acceptable test weight and grain protein concentration. It was developed by Rob Graf at Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada’s Lethbridge Research Centre. It expressed a combination of disease and pest resistance traits well suited to Alberta and western Saskatchewan, including resistance to stripe rust, moderate resistance to common bunt and fusarium head blight and improved leaf spot reaction. It is also tolerant to infestation by Biotype 1 of the Russian wheat aphid. W512 was susceptible to stem rust, which would discourage production in the eastern Prairies.

Canada Western General Purpose (CWGP) wheat

21) W520 is a winter wheat intended for the Canada Western General Purpose class, developed by Anita Brûlé-Babel at the University of Manitoba. It’s suitable for Western Canada’s winter wheat production area. It is high yielding with good resistance to stem and leaf rust, as well as stripe rust. Test weight is higher than the checks.

22) GP 131 is a spring wheat intended for the Canada Western General Purpose class developed by Curtis Pozniak, a wheat breeder at the University of Saskatchewan’s Crop Development Centre. It was endorsed by all three evaluation teams and therefore automatically recommended for registration. A summary of its attributes was not available when this was posted.

Triticale

23) T235 is a spring triticale, well adapted to the Canadian Prairies, put forward by Seed-Link, Inc. It yielded seven, eight and seven per cent higher than the checks in Zones 1, 2 and in all three Western Canada zones. It had slightly lower Hagberg falling number than AC Ultima, but much higher than Pronghorn and Brevis.

Fall rye

24) RT209, also known as KWS Brasetto, is a hybrid fall rye launched in 2014 by KWS. It outyields conventional fall rye by 20 to 25 per cent. It has higher quality and consistency relative to traditional open-pollinated cultivars such as Hazlet. It has good winter hardiness, improved falling numbers and level heading. Seed will be available this fall.

25) RT210, also known as Guttino is another hybrid fall rye from KWS with similar attributes to KWS Brasetto.

Interim registration

The following have been in trials as Canada Prairie Spring (CPS) but that’s likely to change:

1) Faller is a high-yielding American Dark Northern Spring wheat that has been grown in Manitoba the past two years under identity-preserved contracts. It has weaker gluten strength than CWRS or CPS wheats. Although Faller was initially intended for the CPS class the Canadian Grain Commission is proposing it go into a new milling class. See more on Faller in the March 5 or at http://www.manitobacooperator.ca/news-opinion/news/faller-prosper-recommended-for-interim-registration/?module=carousel&pgtype=homepage.

2) Prosper is a sister variety to Faller with a similar background and attributes. See more on Prosper in the March 5 or at http://www.manitobacooperator.ca/news-opinion/news/faller-prosper-recommended-for-interim-registration/?module=carousel&pgtype=homepage.

3) Elgin ND is currently intended for the red Canada Prairie Spring class, but could eventually be included in the Canadian Grain Commission’s proposed new milling wheat class being designed for weaker gluten strength milling wheats such as Faller and Prosper. It was developed at North Dakota State University by Mohamed Mergoum and brought forward by FP Genetics. The disease evaluation team did not assign disease ratings to the variety, citing a lack of data. Despite this the committee as a whole voted to recommend it for interim registration. FP Genetics says the variety yields well, has great agronomics and a very competitive disease package.

Fall rye

4) RT212 is a hybrid fall rye, also known as KWS Bono from KWS. It is higher yielding (34 per cent better) and has higher quality and consistency relative to traditional open-pollinated cultivars such as Hazlet. It has good winter hardiness, improved falling numbers and level heading. There will be limited seed supplies available in 2015.

Hard white winter (this is not an official Canadian Grain Commission class)

5) W530 is a hard white winter wheat, which will be covered under a Canadian Grain Commission experimental grade for identity-preserved production while its market potential is explored. It was developed by Rob Graf at Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada’s Lethbridge Research Centre. Over two years of registration testing, it combined slightly higher grain yield than the mean of the Canada Western Red Winter (CWRW) wheat checks with acceptable winter survival, late maturity, short stature, acceptable test weight and kernel mass, and good resistance to stem, leaf and stripe rust. It expressed moderate susceptibility to fusarium head blight based on visual response, but had lower DON and fusarium-damaged kernels than the CWRW checks. It is susceptible to common bunt. It has exceptional milling properties, producing very high yields of bright-white, low-ash flour of excellent gluten strength relative to its protein content.The Canadian International Grains Institute says it shows promise for Asian steamed breads, a high-value market. It also performs well in whole grain bread and white salted noodles.

Canada Western General Purpose

6) KWS Sparrow, is a high-yielding midge-resistant spring wheat variety developed by KWS-UK in Thriplow, England intended for the Canada Western General Purpose class. It is best adapted to the high-production wheat areas located in the mid- to long-season zones in Western Canada. Trials across Western Canada in 2013 and 2014 indicated KWS Sparrow yielded higher than the check varieties and expressed resistance to fusarium head blight. It will provide significant production advantages and easier harvestability to farmers who grow it for the ethanol and the livestock-feeding industries. Seed will be increased in 2015 and be commercially available in 2016.

7) KWS Belvoir is also from KWS-UK, intended for the Canada Western General Purpose class and has the same attributes as KWS Sparrow.

About the author

Reporter

Allan Dawson

Allan Dawson is a reporter with the Manitoba Co-operator based near Miami, Man. Covering agriculture since 1980, Dawson has spent most of his career with the Co-operator except for several years with Farmers’ Independent Weekly and before that a Morden-Winkler area radio station.

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