GFM Network News


Year-round grazing requires year-round planning and management.

Winter grazing not just about winter

Regenerative grazing key to year-round pasture management

Whenever Steve Kenyon gives a presentation on year-round grazing systems, producers immediately think only of winter grazing. Bale grazing, swath grazing, crop residue grazing — Kenyon knows that producers who graze their cattle over winter love to talk about these things. But he cautions that, despite their importance, these methods are only a small part

(Outdoorfarmshow.com)

Canada’s Outdoor Farm Show looks to lock in land base

GFM plans to buy research land for eastern Discovery Farm

As Canada’s Outdoor Farm Show goes digital this week, its operator is preparing to secure its real-world footprint in southern Ontario and put that real estate to year-round work. Glacier FarmMedia and the Ontario government on Tuesday announced their intent to work toward a land deal with the Agricultural Research Institute of Ontario (ARIO), which


Regenerative ag takes soils off life support

Regenerative ag takes soils off life support

Diversity in all its forms is key to ‘regen ag’

We’ve got to stop treating our soil like dirt. That statement is among the driving forces behind the growing number of Canadian farmers adopting regenerative agriculture, a movement that has gained traction over the last decade as both knowledge and interest in soil biology has spread among academics and producers. Put in basic terms, ‘regen

Lowering tire pressure is one of the first places to start to reduce compaction damage.

How to prevent compaction at harvest

Limiting damage starts with decisions when combines go into fields

Field activity makes soil compaction worse. That’s just the nature of the work. But there are methods to reduce it, in favourable and unfavourable conditions. Ways to reduce soil compaction vary, depending on soil type, field conditions, equipment capability, operation style, and other factors. For Alex Barrie, a Bowmanville, Ont.-area farmer and soil management engineer

University of Manitoba researchers Mario Tenuta, Don Flaten and Xiaopeng Gao, along with provincial soil fertility specialist John Heard, were at the field tour site July 23 to answer questions.

Self-guided 4R tour brings new research in era of COVID-19

Through video, University of Manitoba researchers presented new research on increasing nitrogen use efficiency in grain corn

Soil fertility specialists from the University of Manitoba brought the latest “4R” research to the public while keeping a healthy distance, thanks to an innovative self-guided field tour July 23-25 near Carman. “The beauty of a self-guided tour is that people can do it at their leisure,” soil ecology professor, Mario Tenuta told the Manitoba


Ryan Pritchard and Yvonne Lawley point out the features of his strip tiller, which Pritchard modified himself.

Soil is complicated… so are people

Soil Council of Canada's summit on soil health explored diverse issues of soil health across Canada and how to win people to the cause

It used to take six or seven passes over Ryan Pritchard’s fields to get them ready for spring — harrow, cultivate, harrow, deep till, fertilize. Pritchard, who works full time off farm, was looking for a way to save time. “Can’t go no till. It’s too cold a climate,” he told a tour group during

VIDEO: Soil stewardship event digs into soil health

VIDEO: Soil stewardship event digs into soil health

Foodgrains forum on soil conservation takes centre stage at Ian N. Morrison Research farm in Carman

Manitoba Co-operator reporter Geralyn Wichers talks with Dr. Francis Zvumoya (above) from the University of Manitoba’s Soil Science Department about soil degradation across the globe and what people in Manitoba are doing to support soil stewardship. Manitoba Co-operator reporter Geralyn Wichers talks with James Kornelson, Public Engagement Coordinator for the Canadian Foodgrains Bank about its

The understanding of how landscapes offer ecological goods and services has grown and matured since the earliest ALUS projects.

Province turns to ALUS for watershed conservation lessons

The provincially announced endowment fund will produce about $2.5 million every year to pay landowners for conservation projects on their land

It’s not quite door to door, but the province’s next watershed investments will still look more to the individual landowner. The province has promised a $52-million endowment fund for the Growing Outcomes in Watersheds (GROW) program, a program the province says will be based around the ALUS, or alternative land use services, model. Why it


Photo: Thinkstock

Four ways to increase your organic matter

A question that I hear a lot is, “How do cover crops fit into a grain operation?” Lots of grain farmers have no desire to get into the livestock business and no interest in producing hay. But many have some soil issues that need to be addressed. This can be done by buying more iron

Just what does the term ‘soil health’ mean? A lot of different things, it turns out.

Ag Days speakers banter on soil health

Soil health is a hot topic, but there’s no clear definition of what it is and how to improve it

What’s soil health? Ask five people that question and you might get five different answers — even among Ag Days experts. Soil health and soil degradation are getting plenty of time in the headlines, with coverage of last year’s Summit of Canadian Soil Health in Guelph, soil tests looking beyond nutrients and into microbiology and