GFM Network News


‘Why you should own a Versatile sprayer’

Our History: May 15, 1958

This Versatile 40-foot boom-type sprayer advertised in our May 15, 1958 issue featured Delavan Select-A-Spray control at the fingertips of the operator. Weather was the big news that month. Seeding had apparently been early that year — a story in the May 1 issue said that after being one of the “hot spots” in North

CNH begins 3D-printing spare parts

In a twist on the idea of ordering parts online, the parent firm for New Holland and Case IH is trying out the use of 3D printing to make plastic — and eventually metal — spare parts. British-based equipment manufacturing giant CNH Industrial said Monday it has already produced its first 3D-printed spare parts, making


Dayton Dozer blades for your tractor

Our History: February 1964

This Dayton utility dozer blade was advertised in our February 1964 issues. The lead story on our Feb. 13 front page reported that a legislative commitee on livestock marketing in Manitoba had recommended that a provincial hog-marketing commission be established to inject more competition into the marketplace. However, it did not recommend a producer-controlled board.

Deere plans price increases to offset rising costs

Chicago | Reuters — Shares of Deere and Co. soared Friday after the U.S. tractor maker revised up its full-year earnings estimate on stronger equipment demand and shared its plans to increase prices to offset increased costs. The company’s stock was up 6.4 per cent at $156.24 in early afternoon trading on the New York



Farm equipment manufacturers looking to boost exports

These manufacturers are a small-town Canada success story and major employers for their home communities

Canada’s farm machinery makers want to grow their export market in the coming years, a development they say would be a good news story for rural Canada as a whole. “Canadian-made farm equipment is among the highest quality and most sought out in the world,” Leah Olson, president of the Agricultural Manufacturers of Canada (AMC),


Crumbling river infrastructure is putting pressure on the ability of the U.S. to meet grain market demand.

Wooden dams and river jams: U.S. strains to ship record grains

In a story familiar to Prairie farmers, the U.S. grain-handling system is creaking under a heavy load

America’s worst traffic jam this fall occurred on the Ohio River, where a line of about 50 miles of boats hauling grains and other products turned into a water-borne parking lot, as ship captains waited for the river to reopen. Such delays are worsening on the nation’s waterways, which are critical to commerce for the