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Spring’s arrival brings price improvement

Many buyers were clearly interested in herd building at this sale

As the spring weather slowly unfreezes the landscape, so too have prices found new life.

The warmer weather has no doubt enabled buyers to review low volumes from the winter season and made them more aware of their stock supply. Producers delivered 100 sheep and goats to the latest sale at Winnipeg Livestock Auction April 18.

Two separate groups of Suffolk-cross ewes entered the arena, displaying similar body development, which caused some bidding excitement. These groups were likely purchased to grow and improve an existing herd. These ewes brought $1.27 and $1.33/lb. A third group of Suffolk-cross ewes were of maturity and had limited purpose. These ewes brought $1.19/lb.

A 300-pound Suffolk-cross ram showed similar quality, and with a calm temperament on display he was easily manageable in the ring.

The heavyweight class was clearly divided by the buyers into future breeding stock and those for butchering. Two 115-pound Cheviot-cross lambs brought $232.50 ($2.02/lb.). A group of four 119-pound lambs brought $1.43/lb. Another group of two 118-pound lambs brought $1.26/lb.

A 105-pound Rideau-cross lamb represented the market lamb class, bringing $1.80/lb.

No feeder lambs were delivered.

The selection for lightweight lambs was very limited, which will add to the pressure of future sales. There was, even under these circumstances, a price difference between wool and hair lambs. A 75-pound Rideau-cross lamb brought $2.60/lb. A 73-pound Katahdin-cross lamb brought $2.27/lb.

More buyers became involved in the bidding when the new-crop lambs entered the arena. These lambs showed quality and well-maintained structures.

The goat doe class has remained in a high price range for the past few sales. Some of the goat does could have been more fattened. Quality was a little less for some of the goat does. The Alpine breed represented the dairy class this sale.

The lone goat buck created some intense bidding, initially based upon his appearance and colouration. A few minutes in the arena, his calm and gentle attitude was noticed.

The goat kid prices have started to increase to levels similar to the late-fall/early-winter prices before Christmas. Although the goat kid prices are improving they’re still not as high as previous peaks. Buyers had good selection.

The Ontario Stockyard Report stated there was a very low volume of animals. However, no special rise in the price bidding — just normal activities.

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