Warm weather returns to the Prairies late next week

Issued: Monday, August 31, 2015 – Covering: September 2 – September 9, 2015

Last week’s forecast once again played out fairly close to what was predicted, but with a couple of timing issues. For example, the cold front forecasted for last Sunday was a little slow and didn’t push through until Monday morning.

This forecast period is going to start off on the warm side, with high temperatures on Wednesday and probably Thursday pushing the 30 C mark.

This warm weather is due to a large area of low pressure sitting over Western Canada. This low is forecast to move off to the northeast on Friday and in doing so will bring about an end to the really warm and humid weather, at least for a little while.

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Friday will be a transition day with a mix of sun and clouds, with high temperatures in the low 20s. Saturday looks like it will be cloudy and cool with highs only in the upper teens to lower 20s as a large trough of low pressure slides through. Sunday should see clearing skies as high pressure begins to build in from the northwest. This high will dominate our weather for much of next week as it slowly slides to the east.

Monday through Wednesday should see mainly sunny skies due to this high. Temperatures will start out pretty cool Monday, with overnight lows expected in the 5 C range. At this point I don’t think we’ll see any frost, but for some frost-prone areas it can’t be ruled out. Under the sunny skies daytime highs should be able to recover to around 20 C. As the high moves off to the east, winds will become more southerly, helping temperatures to warm a bit each day. By Wednesday, just in time for the start of school, daytime highs should be back into the mid-20s with overnight lows in the low teens.

Usual temperature range for this period: Highs, 16 to 27 C; lows, 4 to 13 C.

About the author

Co-operator contributor

Daniel Bezte

Daniel Bezte is a teacher by profession with a BA (Hon.) in geography, specializing in climatology, from the U of W. He operates a computerized weather station near Birds Hill Park.

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