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Forecast – for Jun. 9, 2011

It seems we are stuck with a broken record weatherwise. The current unsettled pattern looks to continue for at least this forecast period. The only good news is that we are slowly making our way into summer, which means no matter what, our temperatures will continue to slowly warm up!

This week once again looks to be dominated by a fairly intense area of low pressure. This low is expected to develop and affect our region during the first half of this week. How much rain it will bring is still up in the air (OK, bad pun) but it does look like much of the southern portion of Manitoba will see some measurable rain from this system.

I’d like to say that dry weather and heat will build in behind this system, but unfortunately this doesn’t look like it will be the case – at least not yet – though I don’t think we will see the big push of cold air like we have with the last couple of systems. Once this low pushes through on Wednesday, we should see high pressure build in. This will bring sunshine and high temperatures in the low 20s for Thursday and Friday.

Over the weekend we will be stuck between two lows, one to our southeast and one to the west. Just how much cloud we will see from these systems is still very much in question. If we see more sun than clouds, then temperatures will be mild, with highs in the low 20s; if there are more clouds than sun, then highs will only be in the upper teens.

The forecast for the first half of next week is a little “iffy” right now. The models show weak low pressure lingering across the region. This would probably result in a mix of sun and clouds, with chances for showers or thundershowers with highs in the low 20s.

Usual temperature range for this period: Highs:18 to 28 C.Lows:5 to 14 C.

About the author

Co-operator contributor

Daniel Bezte

Daniel Bezte is a teacher by profession with a BA (Hon.) in geography, specializing in climatology, from the U of W. He operates a computerized weather station near Birds Hill Park.

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