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Forecast – for Jul. 28, 2011

Last week, we saw the low in northern Manitoba slow down and deepen more than anticipated. Along with that, the southern ridge of high pressure moved farther east than forecasted. Put the two together and that spelt windy and cool conditions for much of Manitoba late last week and to start the weekend.

For this forecast period it looks like the heat will try to build back in as an upper ridge of high pressure tries to re-establish itself across the central United States.

To start this forecast period we will be dealing with an area of low pressure that will be pushing through our region. This system will have a fair bit of water to work with, and may bring some heavy rains in the form of thunderstorms to a few isolated areas on Wednesday.

It then looks like we’ll go back into the same general pattern we have seen for much of this month. Weak areas of low pressure will be sitting to our north and west, with high pressure situated to our southeast.

This will place us under a weak southerly flow that will slowly help temperatures increase towards the high end of the usual temperature range for this time of the year by the weekend.

To start the weekend, the western low will slowly drift through northern Manitoba, bringing a chance of thunderstorms to southern and central regions. By Sunday, weak high pressure should be in place once again bringing plenty of sunshine along with warm temperatures.

For the first half of next week weak low pressure will once again form to our west and will then slowly drift eastwards. The southerly flow ahead of this feature will allow temperatures to remain warm and we’ll see chances for thundershowers and storms each day.

Usual temperature range for this period. Highs: 21 to 30 C Lows: 9 to 16 C

About the author

Co-operator contributor

Daniel Bezte

Daniel Bezte is a teacher by profession with a BA (Hon.) in geography, specializing in climatology, from the U of W. He operates a computerized weather station near Birds Hill Park.

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