GFM Network News


G4 swine flu virus not new, China says

Ag ministry says virus does not infect or sicken humans, animals easily

Shanghai/Beijing | Reuters — China’s ministry of agriculture and rural affairs said Saturday that the so-called “G4” strain of swine flu virus is not new and does not infect or sicken humans and animals easily, rebuffing a study published last week. That study, by a team of Chinese scientists and published by the U.S. journal

The strength and resilience of Canadian agriculture and our food supply chain is a result of science and research.

Comment: Is science back in style?

There have been some unexpected impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic. One of these is the new celebrity status of our chief medical health officers. A lot of people who just a few short months ago never even knew every province had a chief medical health officer are now hanging on to every word. Does this mean science and respected authority


Glyphosate not a carcinogen, U.S. EPA reiterates

Chicago | Reuters — The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) said on Tuesday that glyphosate, a chemical in many popular weed killers, is not a carcinogen, contradicting decisions by U.S. juries that found it caused cancer in people. The EPA’s announcement reaffirms its earlier findings about the safety of glyphosate, the key ingredient in Bayer’s

Study skewers palm oil tactics

The World Health Organization has likened palm oil lobbying to the tobacco and alcohol industries

Reuters – The palm oil industry is deploying tactics similar to those of the alcohol and tobacco industries to influence research into the health effects of its product, a study published by the World Health Organization said Jan. 8. Evidence of the health impact of palm oil is mixed, with some studies linking consumption to

Comment: The protein wars are here

The consumer’s view of meat is changing and producers need to be aware of that

Apparently, Canada is going meatless, unless you are a white older male, that is. Well, that may be a slight exaggeration, as many Canadians still need a regular meat fix. In fact, many see meat consumption as one of the pleasures in life, as well as a necessary part of a balanced diet. Some even


To try to slow the spread of antimicrobial resistance, Canada supports an international campaign to reduce the use of human crucial medicines that treat livestock and companion animals.

Veterinarians back key recommendations on combating antimicrobial resistance

Controlling use of medicines in animals linked to protecting effectiveness of human drugs

The Commons Health Committee has hit the mark with a report on combating antimicrobial resistance (AMR), says the Canadian Veterinary Association. That group says the committee report, which aims to preserve the continued effectiveness of human medicines contains useful recommendations and recognizes steps already taken by vets and farm groups. It also sets out constructive

Southeast Asia a ‘hot spot’ for antibiotic abuse

An FAO official says there’s a need for both better education and greater enforcement

Overuse and misuse of antibiotics in food is rife in Southeast Asia, a Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) official said Jan. 31, warning of serious risks for people and animals as bacterial infections become more resistant to treatment. The official from the United Nations’ food agency issued the warning on the sidelines of an international

Incoming changes to veterinary drug rules were discussed during the recent Manitoba Beef Producers district meeting in Austin Nov. 3.

Import changes looming for veterinary drugs

Canadian producers have used the U.S. to access cheaper veterinary drugs, 
but the list of approved drugs is about to change Nov. 13

Livestock producers are still in the dark on incoming changes to the list of approved veterinary drugs they may source from the U.S. Health Canada is tightening regulations on own-use importation, a practice allowing producers to buy approved drugs in the United States and carry them into Canada. As of Nov. 13, that list of



EU delays decision on glyphosate

Brussels | Reuters — EU countries failed on Wednesday to vote on a licence extension for glyphosate, delaying again a decision on the widely used herbicide that critics say could cause cancer. The European Commission said in a statement the relevant committee did not hold a vote at a meeting and that it would announce