GFM Network News


What’s a farm wife? The women of agriculture consider what an old term means in modern day.

Resilience, resourcefulness, inequality: revisiting the ‘farm wife’

A fraught Twitter conversation raised deep questions of how women relate to agriculture, and how agriculture treats them

Farm wife’ or ‘Farmer’s wife.’ Some women embrace these as near-heroic titles, while others feel they relegate them to supporting roles in their farm’s story.  Either way, it stirs up strong emotions, as Megz Reynolds recently experienced after she posted to Twitter questioning the term’s longevity in the agro-sphere.  “Why are so many in agriculture

Walker with business partner Brett Locke. 

Synergy Seeds a local success story

Faces of Ag: Kristie Walker shared lessons learned from her leap into entrepreneurship with the Advancing Women in Agriculture conference

Kristie Walker remembers calling her parents the day she quit her job to start a seed retail business. She remembered “the phone just kind of going quiet,” she told her virtual audience at the Advancing Women in Agriculture Conference. She told her parents, “Well I kind of have a plan, but not really, and no


Stefanie (left) and Cassandra (right) Lepp embrace the seeming dichotomy between fashion and farming in this photo, posted to Instagram.

Two Lepps, one farm

Cassandra and Stefanie Lepp 
turned fashion sense into a platform to talk 
farming sense and to inspire women 
in agriculture

To some, fashion and farming may seem at the opposite ends of the spectrum. For one pair of farming sisters, the two work hand in hand. Cassandra and Stefanie Lepp farm together near Rivers, Manitoba. They use a mix of fashion photography and gritty farm shots to paint a picture of their life, and to speak out on Instagram about

Susan Stewart provokes gales of laughter during her Monday keynote on healing stress with humour.

Farm Women’s Conference brings laughs and lessons

After a tough year of farming, Manitoba’s farming women lightened up with funny and empowering speakers

Agricultural women came together for a little levity and learning after a rough year of farming at this year’s Manitoba Farm Women’s Conference. “People are going through tough times all the time, and this year was especially hard,” said conference organizer Jody Jury. “People need a little bit of laughter and they come together for a bit of a good

Mary Robinson (l) president of the Canadian Federation of Agriculture, Marie-Claude Bibeau (r) federal minister for agriculture and agri-food.

Editorial: About time

The world of Canadian agriculture made a couple of big strides in the field of gender parity this week. The Canadian Federation of Agriculture elected its first female president, Mary Robinson. While the name might be new to western Canadian members she’s well known in Atlantic Canada agriculture. She’s managing partner of a sixth-generation family


A global study shows the advancement of women in agriculture worldwide but more work is needed to close the gender gap.

Women in agriculture say barriers to equality persist

A 17-country study conducted by Corteva Agriscience shows most respondents report progress toward gender equality, but cite key actions needed to remove obstacles for full participation in agriculture

Women farmers worldwide say they’re making progress when it comes to achieving gender equality, but they also don’t expect full equality to come any time soon. In fact, it could be decades away, with widespread gender discrimination persisting that also poses obstacles to their ability to help feed the world, respondents told the Global Women

Panelists Laura Lazo of Manitoba Women in Agriculture, Pam Bailey, chair of Ag Women Manitoba and Arenda Vanderdeen of the Manitoba Women’s Institute told the recentManitoba Farm Women’s Conference
that technology can trump geographic isolation.

Linked by technology

Manitoba Farm Women’s conference panel says technology can connect women in agriculture into powerful networks

Women who farm and live in rural Manitoba need relationships with each other, not merely ‘connections,” — not easy to establish or maintain given provincial geography. But organizations well established and new are working hard to change that, and with a high-tech twist. Why it matters: Manitoba women in the agriculture sector can be geographically

Motivational speaker and North Dakota farmer Katie Dilse leads one of several sessions on life balance during the 
2017 Manitoba Farm Women’s Conference Nov. 19-21 in Brandon.

The changing face of the farm-her

Female farmers, agriculture industry workers and others gathered for Manitoba Farm Women’s Conference

The Manitoba Farm Women’s Conference wants female farmers to start thinking about the next century-and-a-half. The 31st incarnation of the event landed in Brandon Nov. 19-21, taking on the theme, “Advancing Farm Women for the Next 150 years.” Conference chair Donna Lee Brown said the theme is a play on Canada 150, marking changes in agriculture and


Chelsea Boonstra says social media is giving young women in agriculture like her a voice.

Farm Women’s Conference sees upsurge

Young farm women are showing more interest in the organization which pleases longtime members

What a difference a decade can make. Ten years ago, as the Manitoba Farm Women’s Conference celebrated its 20th anniversary, many of the organizers were wondering quietly if it might be time to consider wrapping things up. Attendance had been falling, the membership was, like in many farm-based groups of the time, aging, and the

Survey examines barriers to women in agriculture

Both sexes are invited to complete the survey before Nov. 30

The Canadian Agricultural Human Resource Council (CAHRC) has launched an online survey to learn more about barriers preventing women from taking leadership roles in agriculture. “We have to fully understand the situation before we can take steps towards improving women’s access to leadership and business opportunities in agriculture,” said CAHRC executive director Portia MacDonald-Dewhirst in