GFM Network News


Frosty weeds and closing spray windows

Variables like weed species and recent and expected frosts will weigh into management decisions

Add the weather forecast into your calculations when planning fall weed control. It’s prime weed control season for perennial weeds like Canada thistle and winter annuals and acting now can help you, come spring. “A lot of the winter annuals are starting to become problems because if we don’t do any kind of control in

Herbicide-resistant wild oats are still controlled by glyphosate — for now.

Now’s the time to find resistant weeds

Herbicide-resistant weeds are on the rise and pre-harvest is a good time to find them

Delaying the onset of herbicide-resistant weeds isn’t a lost cause. In fact the more vigilant a farmer is the more success they’ll have, says Ingrid Kristjanson, a farm production extension specialist with Manitoba Agriculture and Resource Development (MARD). With farmers checking crop maturity as harvest grows near, it is also a good time to scout


A kochia seedling breaks ground near Winkler in late March.

Spring weeds rise up well ahead of seeding efforts

Weed forecasts have farmers expecting to reap the consequences of last year’s lack of field work

Farmers are gearing up for spring seeding, but the weeds have already made it to the field. Manitoba’s provincial weed specialist, Tammy Jones, says producers are already starting from behind on weed control this year, thanks in large part to harvest conditions last fall. Why it matters: Seeding is stressful enough as is, but farmers

David Rourke (right) takes a closer look at a green manure blend during an organic field tour near Boissevain this summer.

Field work gap means spring shifts for organic growers

Organic farmers are starting from behind this spring after little field work got done last fall

Organic farmers are gearing up for a more complicated start to the growing season after missing much of their field work last fall. Last year’s “harvest from hell” is still sending shocks through Manitoba operations, with wet weather leaving many farmers with unharvested acres and incomplete fertilizer applications. For the organic sector, that same delay

The learning curve of cover crops

Cover crops may have an almost endless number of combinations, but end goals, planting windows and seed costs may help narrow down species selection

It’s not enough to convince producers to give cover crops a shot — there needs to be a game plan. There are plenty of reasons why. Seed can be expensive, especially if there’s no livestock to help recoup that cost through their digestive systems. Many worry the fall seeding window is too narrow to give


The Harrington Seed 
Destructor has come a long way since it was first developed in 2012.
 Originally a tow-behind unit that 
attached to the back of the combine, the new weed seed management tool is now a mill that can be integrated with the combine ― at half the price.

Is the weed seed ‘destructor’ ready for prime time in Canada?

Aussie invention is much cheaper, easier to use, but is still in the ‘promising, not proven’ category

In the battle against herbicide-resistant weeds, the Harrington Seed Destructor might just win us the war — if farmers can justify the $100,000 price tag. “If herbicides are still working, it can be hard to convince producers to spend that kind of money to purchase this kind of equipment,” said federal research scientist Breanne Tidemann.

There was plenty of interest in a comparison of roller crimping versus tillage for cover crop management at Canada’s Outdoor Farm Show in Woodstock, Ont.

To till or not to till

Demo highlights differences between tillage and no-till cover crop practices

As more producers start to incorporate cover crops into their soil health strategy, machinery companies are racing to develop tillage and non-tillage options to manage them. When choosing how to manage your cover crops, the first thing to address is whether you want to use tillage or go to a non-tillage option like a roller

Fall is the time when you can see what’s survived your crop season’s control efforts.

Fall management key to weed resistance

It’s in the fall you see what worked and what you can change up for next year

When it comes to weed control, fall is often one of your best windows to find out how it’s going and what issues are on the horizon. Tammy Jones, Manitoba Agriculture weed specialist, says the fall season offers a planning window for next year and lets farmers evaluate what went right or wrong this season.


Manitoba Agriculture has recently confirmed more cases of Tall waterhemp in the province. It’s a tier-one noxious weed that must be destroyed no matter where it’s found.

New cases of Tall waterhemp found in Manitoba

This is a Tier 1 noxious weed that Manitoba Agriculture wants to prevent from spreading

Tall Waterhemp has been confirmed in four new Manitoba fields and there are rumours of more, Manitoba Agriculture weed specialist Tammy Jones said in an interview Aug. 2. Tall Waterhemp is a Tier one noxious weed that must be destroyed no matter where it’s found, but that can include hand weeding within crops where practical,

Farmers who maybe weren't too initially concerned about weed pressure will need to keep a close eye on fields.

A messy year for weeds

Farmers didn’t see many weeds early this year, but agronomists warned that the flush was coming

Manitoba’s spring weather may have set weeds back, but the spray season hasn’t been a picnic for farmers either. Provincial weed specialist Tammy Jones warns that producers might be in for a tough weed control season, despite cool temperatures and dry conditions keeping weeds from gaining ground early this year. Why it matters: Clean fields this spring may have