GFM Network News


Most of Prairies already covered in snow

MarketsFarm — Most of the Canadian Prairies were already blanked in snow by late November, with the deepest snowpack in Alberta and Saskatchewan, according to data compiled by Environment Canada and the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Aside from the Rocky Mountains and some areas around the Great Lakes, the U.S. was largely

Comment: Election winds blowing big change in U.S.

In the recent U.S. election, one of the most prominent Dem losers was longtime ag committee chairman Collin Peterson. The race to be the new chair is already underway. The three front-runners — Georgian David Scott, Californian Jim Costa, and Ohioan Marcia Fudge — each represent a different direction. Scott and Fudge are stronger advocates


U.S. tests OK for CFIA chronic wasting disease certification

ELK | The allowance is meant to help producers enrolled in herd certification, but sending their animals to the U.S. for slaughter

elk The allowance is meant to aid producers enrolled in herd certification, but sending their animals to the U.S. for slaughter

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) has eliminated one irritating piece of red tape for Canadian-born elk slaughtered in the U.S. Canada’s voluntary Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) Herd Certification Program will now accept test results from American labs. Results can now come from labs certified under the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health

U.S. House agriculture leader loses election

Midwest farm sector unsettled by prospect it could lose its place at the table

Democratic U.S. Rep. Collin Peter­son, House Agriculture Committee chair, failed to win re-election in Minnesota on Nov. 3, a loss some agriculture leaders said could hurt the U.S. Midwest’s Grain Belt. Though Democrats retained control of the House and therefore will again chair the committee, Peterson’s exit could shift U.S. spending away from a region

The Fearless Girl statue is seen outside the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) on election day in Manhattan, New York City.

Investors focus on undecided U.S. Senate

As Biden edged in on presidency attention turned to stimulus, taxes, regulation

Reuters – As Democratic nominee Joe Biden edged closer to claiming the presidency, investors were focused on the still-undecided race for control of the Senate and the potential consequences for taxes, regulation and the outlook for more stimulus on Nov. 6. The benchmark S&P 500 had jumped nearly four per cent since election day, driven in part by expectations that divided control


Coronavirus kills 15,000 U.S. mink

Affected states aren't planning to cull

Chicago | Reuters — More than 15,000 mink in the United States have died of the coronavirus since August, and authorities are keeping about a dozen farms under quarantine while they investigate the cases, state agriculture officials said. Global health officials are eying the animals as a potential risk for people after Denmark last week

Iowa, Wisconsin, North Carolina and Indiana are being considered swing states – each also ranks among the country’s top 10 agricultural-producing states.

Opinion: No winner for Canadian farmers

No matter the outcome of the U.S. election, subsidies are going to keep flowing

No matter who wins the upcoming election in the United States, Canadian farmers can expect to continue facing tough competition from their heavily subsidized peers south of the border. Fairly early in his 2016 election bid, it became clear producers saw Trump as the favoured candidate. His nationalist rhetoric helped win farmers over. A candidate

Comment: Now would be a good time for some honest dishonesty

As the U.S. election looms, it makes one pine for simpler political times

Somewhere in southern Illinois there’s a high school yearbook that contains a photo of me and another student leaning against a classroom wall on either side of a 1972 campaign poster of a smiling Richard Nixon. The caption writer, another student, notes that my buddy and I are “standing” with our man, the then incumbent


Family members of longtime JBS USA meat packing plant employee Saul Sanchez, from left, wife Carolina Sanchez, and daughter Estela Hernanez, Beatriz Rangel and Patty Rangel hold a photo of him. He died of COVID-19 in Greeley, Colorado April 10.

INSIGHT: Workers denied benefits for COVID-19 illnesses, deaths

Companies say employees can’t prove illnesses are work-related; workers say plant design all but guarantees transmission

Reuters – Saul Sanchez died in April, one of six workers with fatal COVID-19 infections at meatpacker JBS USA’s slaughterhouse in Greeley, Colorado, the site of one of the earliest and deadliest coronavirus outbreaks at a U.S. meatpacking plant. Before getting sick, the 78-year-old Sanchez only left home to work on the fabrication line, where

With little recourse, most of the browbeaten and scared workers went back to work. As a result, says ProPublica, more than 43,000 were sickened by COVID-19 and “at least 195” died.

Comment: The Big Meat Gang is getting awfully smelly

This U.S. lobby rewrote its country’s COVID response with a bit of pressure on the White House

In a year of too many dark days, Monday, Sept. 14 was a particularly dark day for two reasons. First, on Sept. 14, ProPublica, the non-profit, investigatory news group, published a 3,100-word exposé on how global meat packers used their clout this spring to get a White House order to keep workers on the job