GFM Network News


A lot of potato fields went unharvested on the Prairies this season, but this likely won't increase the price of one of our favourite snacks.

Comment: No need for potato panic

It’s not the consumer who will pay the price for regional potato shortfalls

Most of us love fries and chips. Other than people on a ketogenic diet, most diets don’t discriminate against the mighty potato. It’s even in Canada’s newest food guide. Most dishes using potatoes are loved by Canadians, especially in the wintertime, when colder weather encourages us to seek out more hearty meals. But reports suggest

According to a recent study, the biggest and most successful farmers benefitted the most from President Trump's support package to help counter the financial pain felt by the  U.S./China trade war.

Most of Trump’s U.S. farm aid goes to wealthiest farmers

The top one per cent of aid recipients received an average of more than $180,000

Reuters – More than half of the Trump administration’s $8.4 billion in trade aid payments to U.S. farmers through April was received by the top 10 per cent of recipients, the country’s biggest and most successful farmers, a study by an advocacy group shows. Highlighting an uneven distribution of the bailout, which was designed to


The U.S. president told agriculture secretary Sonny Perdue to hurry up with a plan to pay farmers, said one Capitol Hill watcher.

Opinion: Fuel the market, not the trade war

Complicating an already complicated spring, U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue has announced a broad, new scheme that could pay U.S. farmers up to US$14.5 billion. This second bailout plan will not feature a by-the-bushel payment like last year’s nearly US$9-billion bailout because, Perdue explained, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) doesn’t want the new

Some feel that the consumer trust built on USDA meat inspections may be in jeopardy if the responsibility is turned over to industry.

Comment: ‘No problem, I’ll just stop eating pork’

Actions that will erode confidence in food safety could prove costly

One tried-and-true tool politicians use to deflect public criticism directed at them is as old as politics itself: beat up the press. Someone in Secretary Sonny Perdue’s U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) thought it was time to do just that April 8 as the “FSIS Office of Congressional and Public Affairs” — USDA’s Food Safety

One study determined that if half of all Americans increased their consumption of a fruit and vegetable by a single serving each day, 20,000 cancer cases could be prevented each year.

Comment: ‘Dirty dozen’ list of ‘dangerous’ produce questioned

Unnecessary concern about pesticides could backfire by reducing consumption of cancer-fighting produce

Since 1995, an activist group (Environmental Working Group) has released a so-called “dirty dozen” produce list. However, peer-reviewed studies show this list’s recommendations are not scientifically supportable while other studies show it may negatively impact consumers since it discourages purchasing of any produce — organic or conventional. “There are many ways to promote organic produce


Opinion: It’s not really a ‘Farm’ Bill

You might think that U.S. Treasury officials would have cringed last month when the president and Congress signed off on a Farm Bill with a total cost of US$867 billion. That’s 155 times more than President Trump’s US$5.6-billion request for the border wall, which shut down parts of the U.S. government. In fact, they probably

Much of the plastic trash cleaned up from Canadian shorelines this fall was traceable to five companies.

Comment: All you can eat, including the packaging?

A strong case for taste and food safety will have to be made before consumers will be willing to eat their garbage

Within a year, single-use plastics and excess packaging have become public enemy No. 1. Everyone is talking about how our lives are overrun by too much plastic. A recent Greenpeace-led audit looked at waterways waste and companies involved. Much of the plastic trash cleaned up from Canadian shorelines this fall was traceable to five companies:

Congress, the White House, and most commodity groups are positioning U.S. agriculture to repeat a colossal Farm Bill failure.

Comment: Tell me if you’ve heard this before

Because agriculture policy-makers can’t remember history, farmers may be doomed to repeat it

Truisms don’t need to be completely true to be a truism. For example, “If you live long enough, you’ll see everything” doesn’t mean you will see everything if you live a long life. You may see a great deal, but it’s highly unlikely you’ll see “everything.” Simone de Beauvoir, a French novelist and existentialist, turned


New boss, same brawls

The fate of the U.S. Farm Bill is far from certain in this new landscape

The Trump administration’s turtle-slow start with the Republican-led Congress bodes ill for what it and Republicans said would be a busy legislative year. Tax reform, replacing Obamacare, raising the debt ceiling, and a 2018 budget all await initial action. The GOP chairmen of the House and Senate ag committees, however, aren’t waiting on any White

USDA denies gag order on ARS

The organization says the message was premature and did not represent departmental policy

The U.S. Department of Agriculture said Jan. 24 that an internal email sent to staff at its Agricultural Research Service unit calling for a suspension of “public-facing documents,” including news releases and photos, was flawed and that new guidance has been sent out to replace it. The ARS focuses on scientific research into the main