GFM Network News


A container terminal at the Port of Vancouver. (FangXiaNuo/E+/Canada)

Grain handler group seeks Vancouver port governance overhaul

The WGEA, whose members ship most of Western Canada's grain, complain the port is in a conflict of interest as both developer and regulator

Vancouver, Canada’s biggest port and the most important to Western Canada’s economy, needs major changes in how it operates, the Western Grain Elevator Association (WGEA) says. As a statutory monopoly the port authority is both a port developer and regulator putting it in a conflict of interest, according to WGEA executive director Wade Sobkowich. “We

(iStock photo)

Pulse weekly outlook: Increased demand seen, but problems loom

MarketsFarm — Unlike other commodities, pulses aren’t yet feeling ill effects from an economic downturn due to the COVID-19 coronavirus outbreak, according to Marcos Mosnaim of Globeways Canada in Mississauga. With consumers panic-buying, there has been increased demand for pulses, as many are non-perishable, Mosnaim said. “These products will be there for ages,” he said,



Opinion: Time to buckle up on buses

Opinion: Time to buckle up on buses

With treacherous winter driving conditions upon us and the holidays over, a group of parents is feeling uneasy about sending their children to school on the school bus — and I am among them. My daughter is currently a first grade student at St. Anne Immersion. Since the first day my daughter stepped on board

University of Manitoba associate professor Richard Milgrom spoke on aging in rural Manitoba during a Centre on Aging seminar.

Rural Manitoba is both good and bad for aging seniors

The people make it work, but the places can be hostile environments, says a Centre on Aging speaker

Small towns can be great places to retire and live out one’s golden years — or not. A community with nearby family and lifelong friends is what draws or keeps people there. It’s more difficult to live there when appropriate and well-located housing, good sidewalks, and alternative modes of travel for non-drivers aren’t. Richard Milgrom,


(GullLakeSK.ca)

Wildfire-damaged grazing areas up for Saskatchewan aid

Saskatchewan’s provincial disaster assistance program (PDAP) will be opened up to cover southwestern grazing areas damaged by this fall’s wildfires. The province’s government relations minister, Larry Doke, on Wednesday announced producers who incurred wildfire damage on “tame and native lands” intended for grazing may now apply for assistance to get feed for affected livestock. Winds

Door opens to hog expansion

Door opens to hog expansion

Anaerobic digesters out, new barns in

New hog barns will be built Manitoba. After an all-night session at the Manitoba Legislature, Bill 24 has passed its final reading and received royal assent. Better known as the Red Tape Reduction and Government Efficiency Act, Bill 24 covers legislation ranging from consumer protection and labour relations, to residential tenancies and transportation of dangerous

KAP president Dan Mazier says the farm organization got much of what it wanted from the “Made-in-Manitoba Climate and Green Plan,” including a carbon tax exemption on “marked” farm fuel.

Mazier defends KAP’s approach on ‘made-in-Manitoba’ carbon tax

He says the position was developed democratically and KAP got much of what it wanted to reduce the negative impact on farmers

A year after the Keystone Agricultural Producers (KAP) opted to participate as the provincial government developed “A Made-in-Manitoba Climate and Green Plan,” some KAP members are asking why the farm organization doesn’t oppose a carbon tax. “I find this entire carbon tax thing to be a complete fiasco and I view our prime minister (Justin


Purple fuel is exempt from Manitoba’s $25-a-tonne carbon plan that starts next year, but the province hasn’t decided if the exemption will apply to barn heating or grain dryer fuels. Premier Brian Pallister rolled out his Made-in-Manitoba Climate and Green Plan at Oak Hammock Marsh Oct. 27.

Purple farm fuels exempted from Manitoba carbon tax

The government is emphasizing the newly released ‘Made-in-Manitoba Climate and Green Plan’ is much more than just a carbon tax and is seeking citizen feedback

Purple fuel won’t be subject to Manitoba’s proposed carbon tax, but that exemption may not be extended to heating for barns, greenhouses and grain dryers. The plan calls for Manitoba to bring in a flat $25-a-tonne carbon tax coming next year, rather than the federal government’s $10-a-tonne levy that would rise over time to $50

Agriculture major player in ‘Made-in-Manitoba Climate and Green Plan’

Agriculture major player in ‘Made-in-Manitoba Climate and Green Plan’

Increasing the biodiesel mandate could cut up to 431,000 tonnes of carbon by 2022, second only to reductions expected from the $25-a-tonne carbon tax

Agriculture’s role in reducing carbon emissions and protecting the environment looms large in the provincial government’s, Made-in-Manitoba Climate and Green Plan. The word “agriculture” appears 34 times in the 60-page document. “Manitoba’s farmers are at the front lines of climate change and need to be at the forefront of solutions,” the plan says. “The Manitoba