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In the summer of 1946, Manitoba Pool built this elevator at Miami, opening it officially on August 22, 1946. The former Federal Grain #1 elevator, built nearby in 1927 by Wiley Low (and bought by Federal in 1932), was moved to its east side in 1974 and converted into an annex. The elevator was fully renovated in 1988 and two steel bins were built on its west side. Closed by Agricore around 2001, the elevator was demolished in 2003.

PHOTOS: This Old Elevator: September 2019

In the 1950s, there were over 700 grain elevators in Manitoba. Today, there are fewer than 200. You can help to preserve the legacy of these disappearing “Prairie sentinels.” The Manitoba Historical Society (MHS) is gathering information about all elevators that ever stood in Manitoba, regardless of their present status. Collaborating with the Manitoba Co-operator it is supplying these

The first Manitoba Pool elevator at Goodlands was built in 1928 and renovated in 1971. Eleven years later, the Pool “A” elevator at Deloraine (built in 1949) and a crib annex from the elevator at the nearby siding of Dalny were moved to its west side. Three steel tanks replaced the original elevator in 1985. The CP railway line was abandoned in 1996 and the elevator was closed in 2000. It is now used for private grain storage.

PHOTOS: This Old Elevator: July 2019

The Manitoba Historical Society wants to gather information about all the grain elevators in Manitoba

In the 1950s, there were over 700 grain elevators in Manitoba. Today, there are fewer than 200. You can help to preserve the legacy of these disappearing “Prairie sentinels.” The Manitoba Historical Society (MHS) is gathering information about all elevators that ever stood in Manitoba, regardless of their present status. Collaborating with the Manitoba Co-operator it is supplying these


At the time of this 1964 photo, there were two elevators at Mather. The Manitoba Pool elevator at left was built in 1926. The balloon annexes on each side of it were replaced in 1969 by a single crib annex. Renovated in 1971 and 1986, it closed on December 31, 1996 and was demolished. The United Grain Growers elevator at right dated from 1917. A 1971 trade saw it become Manitoba Pool’s B elevator for five years, closing in 1976.

PHOTOS: This Old Elevator: June 2019

The Manitoba Historical Society wants to gather information about all the grain elevators in Manitoba

In the 1950s, there were over 700 grain elevators in Manitoba. Today, there are fewer than 200. You can help to preserve the legacy of these disappearing “Prairie sentinels.” The Manitoba Historical Society (MHS) is gathering information about all elevators that ever stood in Manitoba, regardless of their present status. Collaborating with the Manitoba Co-operator it is supplying these

An elevator at Domain was built in 1928 by Manitoba Pool Elevators. Nine years later, a collapsing foundation forced it to close until repairs could be made. Initially rated with a 40,000-bushel capacity, it was enlarged with temporary balloon annexes in 1951 then with a 60,000-bushel, 18-bin crib annex in 1966. The facility was fully renovated in 1992. Closed by Agricore in 2001, it was sold into private ownership that oversaw the addition of two steel tanks on its north side.

PHOTOS: This Old Elevator: May 2019

The Manitoba Historical Society wants to gather information about all the grain elevators in Manitoba

In the 1950s, there were over 700 grain elevators in Manitoba. Today, there are fewer than 200. You can help to preserve the legacy of these disappearing “Prairie sentinels.” The Manitoba Historical Society (MHS) is gathering information about all elevators that ever stood in Manitoba, regardless of their present status. Collaborating with the Manitoba Co-operator it is supplying these

In this photo from 1962, we see two of the three elevators that stood at Cracknell, about nine kilometres (six miles) northeast of Russell, at that time. Off camera to the right was United Grain Growers’ first elevator, built in 1921. Beside it was an elevator constructed in 1922 by the Matheson-Lindsay Grain Company and owned successively by the Province Elevator Company (1928-36), Reliance Grain (1936-48), and Manitoba Pool (1948-66) before becoming UGG’s second elevator. Both were closed in September 1973 and demolished. The Paterson elevator at left was built in 1921 using materials salvaged from an elevator at Sintaluta, Saskatchewan. It closed in 2000 and was later demolished.

PHOTOS: This Old Elevator: April 2019

The Manitoba Historical Society wants to gather information about all the grain elevators in Manitoba

In the 1950s, there were over 700 grain elevators in Manitoba. Today, there are fewer than 200. You can help to preserve the legacy of these disappearing “Prairie sentinels.” The Manitoba Historical Society (MHS) is gathering information about all elevators that ever stood in Manitoba, regardless of their present status. Collaborating with the Manitoba Co-operator it is supplying these


An elevator and crib annex at Sanford were built by Manitoba Pool in 1949 to replace ones destroyed by fire in September 1948. Closed in April 1996, it was sold into private hands. Demolition of the annex, seen here in January 2019, was akin to chopping down a tree. After making a large opening on one side, a push on the opposite side brought it down. It took 30 minutes from start to finish then the wood was hauled to the local landfill and burned. Four weeks later, the elevator fell in the same manner.

PHOTOS: This Old Elevator: March 2019

The Manitoba Historical Society wants to gather information about all the grain elevators in Manitoba

In the 1950s, there were over 700 grain elevators in Manitoba. Today, there are fewer than 200. You can help to preserve the legacy of these disappearing “Prairie sentinels.” The Manitoba Historical Society (MHS) is gathering information about all elevators that ever stood in Manitoba, regardless of their present status. Collaborating with the Manitoba Co-operator it is supplying these

A 40,000-bushel elevator at Hargrave, on the CPR Broadview Subdivision, was built in 1928 by Manitoba Pool for a local farmer co-operative. In 1952, its capacity was increased to 85,000 bushels with the construction of a balloon annex alongside it. Traded to United Grain Growers in April 1979, the elevator was operated successively by Agricore United and Viterra. Closed in 2011, the steel tanks were disassembled and the elevator was demolished in July 2014.

PHOTOS: This Old Elevator: February 2019

The Manitoba Historical Society wants to gather information about all the grain elevators in Manitoba

In the 1950s, there were over 700 grain elevators in Manitoba. Today, there are fewer than 200. You can help to preserve the legacy of these disappearing “Prairie sentinels.” The Manitoba Historical Society (MHS) is gathering information about all elevators that ever stood in Manitoba, regardless of their present status. Collaborating with the Manitoba Co-operator it is supplying these

A 42,000-bushel elevator at Forrest, five miles north of Brandon, was built in 1927 by Manitoba Pool. A year later, 22-year-old George Turner was hired as its grain buyer. Transferred to Winnipeg in 1941, he rose through the ranks to become general manager and president of the company. A 66,000-bushel crib annex was built beside the elevator in 1956. The facility closed in mid-1980 when its CPR line was abandoned. It remained in use for private grain storage until about a year before this photo was taken in April 2017. Demolition began in late November 2018.

PHOTOS: This Old Elevator: January 2019

The Manitoba Historical Society wants to gather information about all the grain elevators in Manitoba

In the 1950s, there were over 700 grain elevators in Manitoba. Today, there are fewer than 200. You can help to preserve the legacy of these disappearing “Prairie sentinels.” The Manitoba Historical Society (MHS) is gathering information about all elevators that ever stood in Manitoba, regardless of their present status. Collaborating with the Manitoba Co-operator it is supplying these


In 1910, 38-year-old Grover H. Olmstead of Chicago bought nine quarter sections of land in southwestern Manitoba. He and his wife Florence arrived at Pierson in 1911 and hired locals to build a large barn, two-storey farmhouse, and this small elevator. Unlike most elevators, it did not move grain using a leg. Grain dumped into a pit on its south (right) side flowed into a concrete basement beneath the elevator. From there, a motor-driven blower pushed it up a metal pipe to the top then into one of the interior bins. Grain was removed when it flowed by gravity through wooden spouts into a wagon parked in the basement. Olmstead sold the property in 1920 and it passed through several hands over the next 98 years.

PHOTOS: This Old Elevator: December 2018

The Manitoba Historical Society wants to gather information about all the grain elevators in Manitoba

In the 1950s, there were over 700 grain elevators in Manitoba. Today, there are fewer than 200. You can help to preserve the legacy of these disappearing “Prairie sentinels.” The Manitoba Historical Society (MHS) is gathering information about all elevators that ever stood in Manitoba, regardless of their present status. Collaborating with the Manitoba Co-operator it is supplying these

A 116,000-bushel elevator at Justice in the RM of Elton was built by Manitoba Pool Elevators in 1928, and renovated in 1966 and 1993. A 27-bin crib annex was constructed beside it in 1977. Closed by Agricore in 2001, the facility shown in this 2016 photo was no longer serviced by a railway line but it continued in use for private grain storage. In October 2018, its owner demolished it and the remaining wood was burned on site.

PHOTOS: This Old Elevator: November 2018

The Manitoba Historical Society wants to gather information about all the grain elevators in Manitoba

In the 1950s, there were over 700 grain elevators in Manitoba. Today, there are fewer than 200. You can help to preserve the legacy of these disappearing “Prairie sentinels.” The Manitoba Historical Society (MHS) is gathering information about all elevators that ever stood in Manitoba, regardless of their present status. Collaborating with the Manitoba Co-operator it is supplying these