GFM Network News


Flea beetle is one of the pests a Manitoba researcher is targeting with biotechnology.

Targeting your crop enemies

Is the future of crop protection environmentally friendly biotechnology?

So far biotechnology in agriculture has driven the use of crop protection products through genetically engineered herbicide resistance. But the next wave could displace at least some of those applications by opening up another front in the war on two familiar canola concerns — sclerotinia and flea beetle. Mark Belmonte, a professor of biological science

Shift in weather complicates sclerotinia decisions

Shift in weather complicates sclerotinia decisions

Canola is starting to flower and the canopy is wet, usually a recipe for sclerotinia, but perhaps not this year

Parts of Manitoba have taken a sharp turn from bone dry to very wet since the start of June, and that’s impacting the discussion around sclerotinia. “Because parts of the province have had lots of moisture and lots of humidity, we’re gearing up that it could be a bad sclerotinia season,” Justine Cornelsen of the


VIDEO: Timing fungicide decisions in canola and cereal crops

VIDEO: Timing fungicide decisions in canola and cereal crops

Crop Diagnostic School: A relatively dry growing season in 2019 didn't rule out fusarium issues

At Crop Diagnostic School in July, David Kaminski, plant pathologist with Manitoba Agriculture, said 2019 was a challenge for producers when it came to timing fungicide applications. In this video, Kaminski discusses some of the conditions Manitoba producers faced this growing season in their canola and cereal crops and some of the factors at play

Weather in Manitoba this year has raised sclerotinia questions as producers weigh a bone-dry start with rains that may have put the fungus back in the game.

Decision time on sclerotinia control

The yearly decision may be harder than normal as rain finally falls on Manitoba

Producers are scratching their heads on sclerotinia spray this year. On one hand, the weather has been dry for most of the growing season. Much of agricultural Manitoba still sat at around two-thirds or less of normal rainfall as of June 25, according to Manitoba Agriculture, despite a series of rains since late May. The

Producers attending this year’s Crops-A-Palooza heard that fungicide doesn’t pay on soybeans, and some surprising information in dry bean row spacing.

A crop-by-crop rundown on sclerotinia control

Variety and fungicide are key for control, but for sunflowers there’s only one option — rotation

The good news is the hot, dry summer made sclerotinia somewhat scarce in canola fields this summer, but there was a minor downside — there weren’t many examples to show farmers attending a sclerotinia control session at this year’s Crops-A-Palooza, even in the inoculated demonstration plots at the Canada-Manitoba Crop Diversification Centre (CMCDC) here. But


Farm management specialist Darren Bond (r) says a calculator on the MAFRI website can help calculate break-even costs.

To spray or not to spray for fungal disease

You don’t have to just pencil it in and spray anyway — there are tools to help make the decision

To spray or not to spray for fungal diseases? Will the extra yield offset the cost? In practice this decision is often made based on farmers’ comfort levels, but economics should always be considered, said Holly Derksen, field crop pathologist for Manitoba Agriculture, at this year’s Crop Diagnostic School in Carman. “You have to understand

Changing moisture conditions at flower had farmers hunting for answers on whether to spray for sclerotinia, or leave the fungicide alone.

Changing weather alters sclerotinia strategies

Farmers were waffling over fungicide as canola broke into flower, 
but moisture conditions added a further question mark

Whether to spray for sclerotinia is always a challenging choice, but this year was harder than usual. Dry soil gave little room for the disease to germinate early in the year through much of Manitoba, leaving producers to wonder if a spray pass was worth the expense, says Angela Brackenreed, of the Canola Council of

Changing moisture conditions at flower had farmers hunting for answers on whether to spray for sclerotinia, or leave the fungicide alone.

Sclerotinia a moving target this season

Farmers faced a tougher than normal choice on whether to spray for sclerotinia this year

Whether to spray canola for sclerotinia is always a challenging choice, but this year was harder than usual. Dry soil gave little room for the disease to germinate early in the year through much of Manitoba, leaving producers to wonder if a spray pass was worth the expense, says Angela Brackenreed, of the Canola Council



Is a soybean-canola rotation worth rolling the dice?

Is a soybean-canola rotation worth rolling the dice?

Most farmers aren’t jumping on a soybean-canola rotation, but explosive growth of soybean acres and their westward spread into canola country have some asking the question

Farmers better study up on the hurdles of a soybean-canola rotation before trying it in the field, Manitoba Agriculture specialists say. Soybeans have been a growing story in Manitoba, rising over the last decade to become one of the province’s main crops with almost 2.3 million acres planted in 2017. Combined with canola, another high-value