GFM Network News


Clanman cows munch on feed made of an 11-variety polycrop, including turnips and a few different types of clover.

Regenerate renegades

Faces of Ag: Bucking trends and seeking new ideas led Clanman Jerseys to regenerative agriculture

Not long ago, Sean Smith was in an Alberta lab learning to identify soil micro-organisms. He’s not a scientist. He’s a dairy farmer with a penchant for learning and experimentation — an inherited trait at Clanman Jerseys. “I think that’s probably one of the biggest things about our farm. We’re not afraid to do something

Joey Fiola and Christel Lanthier and their three daughters, Olivia (6), Anne Rose (4) and Lila (1).

Resurrecting the family farm

Faces of Ag: Joey Fiola and Christel Lanthier are determined to give their girls the same farm life that shaped them

As 25 ewes and a gangly baby llama mill around Christel Lanthier, her six-year-old daughter chats to her in French, the language they speak at home. She’s wondering if you want to know anything about the cats, Christel translates for a reporter. Olivia explains the names of the three cats and shows off her stuffed


Ray Archuleta (left) with his volunteers, (left to right): Mike Bennet, Tyson Dueck, Codie Dueck and Markus Dueck.

Spreading the word

Pioneers of regenerative agriculture speak in Rosa

In late January, U.S. conservation ag guru Ray Archuleta asked for four volunteers to come to the front of the room and help him with an experiment. Called the ‘slake test’ it was designed to demonstrate soil stability to the 100 attendees at a soil health workshop at the Shevchenko Ukrainian Centre in Rosa. Archuleta,

Steven Rosenzweig says General Mills is promoting regenerative agriculture because it helps meet the company’s sustainability goals.

Regenerative ag finds a corporate champion

General Mills supports regenerative agriculture, but says it’s not about something to slap on its label

[UPDATED: Feb. 3, 2020] When the topic of who might drive a regenerative agriculture push comes up, one name keeps cropping up: General Mills. The Minnesota-based producer of packaged consumer goods first staked out its claim to this turf by promising in 2015 to source its top 10 ingredients sustainably by 2020. As it nears

Visitors to Brooks and Jen White’s farm, Borderland Agriculture near Pierson, Man., got a closer look at adaptive grazing with bison in summer 2018.

Can regenerative agriculture products find a premium niche?

“We have a product that we should be able to demand a premium from. I just don’t know how to do it,” says Brooks White

Pipestone’s Brooks White needs no convincing about the biological value of regenerative agriculture. His fields of cover crops, annual stands grazed by bison, and adaptive pasture system speak for themselves of his commitment to this way of farming. And for that commitment he’s been rewarded — in the form of lower inputs, higher soil organic matter, more and better feed for his livestock and


Brooks and Jen White farm about 
7,500 acres near Pierson, Manitoba. 

Regenerative agriculture by accident

Faces of Ag: Brooks and Jen White stumbled into regenerative agriculture before they knew what it was — now it’s the foundation of their farm

Brooks and Jen White want a smaller farm. It may seem like a strange ambition, but that is an actual part of their five-year plan — to be smaller in acreage than they are now. “For me, what regenerative ag means is becoming more profitable on a smaller scale — on fewer acres,” Brooks said.

Regenerative agriculture champion Ryan Boyd says he benefited from solid advice from the older generation upon his return to the farm—when he listened.

Two generations benefit when implementing new ideas on the farm

A successful farm transition will rely on the skills and abilities of both parties


When Ryan Boyd returned to the family operation, South Glanton Farms, near Forrest, he knew he wanted to do things a bit differently. His interest had been sparked in the concept of regenerative agriculture, a farming system that aims to increase biodiversity, enrich soils, improve watersheds, enhance ecosystem services and capture carbon in the soil.

Regenerative agriculture event to return to Brandon

Window closing on 'early bird' price regenerative ag conference tickets

The Manitoba Forage and Grassland Association isn’t resting on its laurels after last year’s two-day dive into regenerative agriculture. The production philosophy believes farm practices should build the environment and soil health rather than just maintain them, and will once again be the topic this fall when the MFGA launches its second regenerative agriculture forum.


A blend of cover crop species is a tasty blend for cattle, but make sure they aren’t yours.

Mixed farmers need not apply for cover crop funding

The province says cover crop funding under Ag Action Manitoba only allows grazing on ‘stockless farms’

You can graze cattle on cover crops planted with help from Ag Action Manitoba — as long as they’re not your cattle, that is. Ag Action Manitoba is the province’s vehicle for funding under the Canadian Agricultural Partnership (CAP) program. Cover crops are among the beneficial management practices (BMPs) it promotes to improve the environment.

Clayton Robins is among the few farmers happy about the state of his pastures and hay crops, something he partly credits to his pasture management and integration of alternative grazing on annuals. His take on cover crops has earned him a place in the CFGA’s national carbon sequestration project.

Manitoba forage growers tapped for carbon project

The national project is the next step toward the CFGA’s goal of having farmers paid for storing carbon

Five Manitoba farmers are helping the Canadian Forage and Grassland Association (CFGA) put a value on carbon storage. Ryan Canart of Miniota, Allan Preston of Hamiota, Matt Van Steelandt of Melita, Jonathan Bouw of Anola and Clayton Robins of Rivers are all recognizable names on the grazing, soil health or regenerative agriculture field tour circuits