GFM Network News



The group (nine of the ten women) was drawn together to make the quilts.

Project brings communities together

The group planned to make a quilt for each of two refugee families now in Portage la Prairie

Arabic music played in the background as a group of 10 leaned over sewing machines and cutting-and-piecing tables in the upper room of the MacGregor United Church. Outside it was a lovely spring day, but inside seven women and three teenaged girls were hard at work on a quilting project that had brought together several


Anna Maendel (l) explaining the quilt project to Barb Pantel.

Quilts warm hearts of L’Arche Homes residents

Customized quilts given out at special celebration with quilter Anna Maendel present

The residents of Winnipeg’s seven L’Arche Homes gathered at Dayspring House in late summer to participate in a unique celebration: each of the men and women was presented with a customized quilt made with fabric featuring personal preferences — animals, hobbies, interests and colours. Before the quilts were presented four new assistants were welcomed —

Create cosy rooms in your house this winter

Try a few decorating changes to help get you through those long, cold months

Winter will soon be upon us. Plan now for decorating changes that will get you through the cold months with warmth and comfort. A few updates are all you need to take you through the winter season. Warm fall colours and cosy textures are great additions to take you from summer to winter. This doesn’t

Manitoba Agricultural Museum’s executive director Georgette Hutlet (l) and curator Tanya Wiegand display the museum’s new barn quilt sign, to hang on the fence of the Austin-area museum. 
The pattern is a version of the Log Cabin block and is emblazoned with one of the museum’s most popular artifacts, Big Roy, a Versatile Model 1080.

Let’s cover rural Manitoba with ‘barn quilts,’ say Ag Museum staff

Inspired by other barn quilt trails of southern Ontario and Iowa, staff with the Manitoba Agricultural Museum at Austin hung out their own barn quilt on Mother’s Day and are working with other communities to piece together a map of where more will eventually be found

Eunice and Doug Pratt were heading south through Iowa for a U.S. holiday when they spotted the first ‘barn quilt’ — a brilliant-coloured quilt block affixed to the front of a barn. But it wasn’t made with fabric. It was a large, colourful wooden eight-foot-square painted replica of a quilt block, and one of many


Paperless gift bags

The colours, textures and designs of fabric allow you to get creative, and even the smaller pieces are useful. Recently, a friend brought me a large bagful of remnants of the most delightful designs, one being plastic bandages! I was able to make three bags in different sizes from the piece. Now the first sick

Winter Morning Memories

My nose was cold, my cheeks were cold But the rest of me was warm When I woke on a winter morning In my bedroom on the farm. I’d snuggle deep in layers of quilts I knew I’d hear Mom call, “Time to get up, my sleepy heads” From her bedroom down the hall Dad

Quilting for the bathroom

I had a black mat set for the bathroom and didn’t like the toilet seat cover so that got me thinking. I could use the black and also bring up the colour of the walls and towels. I used a paper-piecing pattern for the feature pattern (any could be used such as flowers, boats etc.),


The Back 40, quilted by Yolande Ranson, was among the artwork featured.

Quilt till you Wilt

Well over 100 masterpieces at Hamiota’s annual show

People enjoy quilts for many different reasons. They can provide clues to the past; warmth, beauty and value; and enjoyment in the form of colour, texture and pattern. Quilts also unleash artistic talents of new and experienced artisans, as was showcased at the 2012 Hamiota Quilt till you Wilt’s late-November annual show at the community

Reduce, reuse and —upcycle?

In the days of our mothers, grandmothers and great-grandmothers, the words “make-do” and “mend” were part of daily life. Hand-me-downs, making articles out of sugar sacks and making quilts out of worn-out clothing were the norm.