GFM Network News


Flea beetles were aggressive feeders in 2019, leading to multiple spray passes for some farmers.

Year in review: Keep an eye out for these critters in 2020

Entomologist John Gavloski says these should be on your radar

Based on what went on in Manitoba fields this past season, producers may want to be on the lookout for several insects in 2020 that could potentially make a reappearance. At the top of the list are flea beetles, cutworms and grasshoppers, according to Manitoba’s provincial entomologist, John Gavloski. Speaking at the recent Manitoba Agronomists

Honeybees can’t rid themselves of deadly mites as effectively after neonic exposure, researchers say.

Neonics leave bees vulnerable to mites, study shows

The pesticides are shown to affect bees’ ability to groom themselves

Neonicotinoid pesticides affect honeybees’ ability to groom and rid themselves of deadly mites, a University of Guelph study has revealed. The research comes as Health Canada places new limits on the use of three key neonicotinoids while it decides whether to impose a full phase-out of the chemicals. Neonics are the most commonly used insecticides


Older products like DDT, seen here in an advertisement from a 1948 issue of Saturday Night magazine, have routinely been replaced by newer and safer products.

Regulatory process improving safety

Older, less safe products have always been phased out for newer, safer ones. The latest issue with neonics is nothing new

The reality of chemical controls is always going to be that relatively speaking they’re a blunt tool. But that also means they’re going to be under scrutiny to ensure their safety. And the safety track record of these products is getting better and better by the season, according to John Gavloski, provincial entomologist. “In an

Editorial: Right questions, wrong answers

Reaction from farmers was swift to last week’s announcement by the Pest Management Regulatory Agency (PMRA) that it plans to phase out most uses of neonicotinoids in Canada over the next three to five years. Shock, confusion and anger pretty much sum it up. Some said that if this relatively new class of products is

A mayfly on water. (SBTheGreenMan/iStock/Getty Images)

Phase-outs planned for clothianidin, thiamethoxam

The remaining two of the big three neonicotinoid insecticides will be phased out of nearly all on-farm use in Canada in the next few years under a proposal from Health Canada’s Pest Management Regulatory Agency. PMRA officials on Wednesday announced 90-day consultation periods on its decisions for both clothianidin and thiamethoxam, following “special reviews” which


Health Canada proposes some neonic restrictions

Health Canada is proposing some restrictions on the use of three neonic pesticides for horticultural production but they would still be registered for use on field crops such as corn and soybeans. Meanwhile the department will continue working with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the State of California on the impact of the pesticides

Treated corn seed. (Syngenta.com)

Two neonics set for three-year extensions on registration

Health Canada’s pesticide regulator proposes to allow continued registration for two members of the neonicotinoid family of pesticides, both of which are under heavy scrutiny for their effects on bees and other pollinators. The Pest Management Regulatory Agency on Tuesday issued proposed decisions on clothianidin and thiamethoxam that would extend the products’ existing conditional registrations

(Photo courtesy ARS/USDA)

French court suspends pesticides over potential harm to bees

Paris | Reuters — A French court suspended on Friday the licence for two pesticides made by Dow Chemical, citing uncertainty over environmental risks including their effects on bees. The preliminary ruling by an administrative court in the city of Nice overturned a decision by France’s health and environment agency ANSES in September to grant


(Jack Dykinga photo courtesy ARS/USDA)

Data mining finds no honeybee colony risk from correct neonic use

An expedition through published and unpublished studies on neonicotinoid pesticides has led a Guelph research team to find no colony-level risk to honeybees from the seed treatments — if they’re correctly used. The University of Guelph team, led by toxicologist Keith Solomon and adjunct professor Gladys Stephenson, analyzed 64 papers from “open, peer-reviewed literature” on