GFM Network News


Canadian, Manitoba farmland values higher in 2019

The yearly growth has slowed in recent seasons and that trend is expected to continue

Average Manitoba farmland values rose four per cent in 2019, just slightly higher than the 3.7 per cent increase recorded in 2018, Farm Credit Canada (FCC) says in its 2019 Farmland Values report released April 6. The biggest increase — 8.9 per cent — was in the Eastman region followed by 4.7 per cent in

Ray Archuleta (left) with his volunteers, (left to right): Mike Bennet, Tyson Dueck, Codie Dueck and Markus Dueck.

Spreading the word

Pioneers of regenerative agriculture speak in Rosa

In late January, U.S. conservation ag guru Ray Archuleta asked for four volunteers to come to the front of the room and help him with an experiment. Called the ‘slake test’ it was designed to demonstrate soil stability to the 100 attendees at a soil health workshop at the Shevchenko Ukrainian Centre in Rosa. Archuleta,


Flooding picture still weather dependent

What happens between now and spring here, and in the U.S. and Saskatchewan, will be the determining factors

The province continues to keep a watchful eye on spring flood conditions, but says the true picture won’t be clear until winter is over. The comments came from Infrastructure Minister Ron Schuler February 4, in a release announcing a new Basin Conditions Report that provided an updated snapshot of river levels and soil moisture conditions. “The report will present Red River and Assiniboine River Basin conditions

Soil moisture and crop data can combine to create a powerful tool to help farmers make more informed decisions.

Wet enough for you?

Bringing weather data into your crop planning decisions can be a powerful tool

If you want to know if you should top dress fertilizer in season, a great place to start is with just how much soil moisture is available. Knowing the answer to that question will tell you if there’s any opportunity still out there to be captured, says Ryan Hutchison, of South Country Equipment. South Country’s

 Guy Ash, of Pessl Instruments, 
demonstrates how a soil probe can 
augment weather station data.

Probe deep into your soil to solve farm’s moisture mystery

Soil probe expert says you can use soil probes and their data to your farm’s financial advantage

Looking around at the wet conditions, at first glance you could think our moisture levels are more than adequately stocked going into the 2020 crop year. Unfortunately looks can be deceiving, and the same goes when looking at your soil profile. When it comes time to plan your planting timing and strategy, knowing the actual


Sam Thorpe of Spade and Plow stands in front of a field of harvested artichoke plants at his family’s farm in San Martin, California, June 3, 2019.

In the heart of the U.S. high tech sector, farmers fight for land

In wealthy Silicon Valley, a $500-million plan to save threatened farmland

Thomson Reuters Foundation – With a swipe of his harvesting knife, Sam Thorpe frees a handful of spinach from its roots in the soil. “In the winter it’s so sweet it’s like candy,” he says, examining the small yield in his palm. For the past four years, Thorpe and his family have built a reputation

People climb a dike formed by wind soil erosion during a field tour at the Global Forum on Soil Stewardship.

Soil degradation a costly global issue

About a third of the world’s soil is degraded, which has economic and food security implications

When Prairie-dwellers think of soil erosion, they may think of iconic photos from the Dirty ’30s: towering clouds of black soil blowing across desolate land, teacups turned upside down against drifting grit. But as Francis Zvomuya told the classroom of farmers and agronomists at the Global Forum on Soil Stewardship, soil degradation is far from

Editor’s Take: Fair’s fair

An old friend lives in Winnipeg along a major thoroughfare that’s slated for expansion at some yet-to-be-determined future date. He and his wife have lived there for nearly 20 years, and the word of the planned roadwork came down shortly after they bought the house. They’ve been told, in no uncertain terms, that once the


Comment: Bring back the PFRA

Soil conservation in Canada has been losing ground despite a general feeling erosion is a problem of the past

Some say it saved Western Canada. But the Prairie Farm Rehabilitation Administration, perhaps the most respected government agency in Canada’s history, was dissolved in 2003. It’s time to bring it back. Scientific principles are one thing. Encouraging farmers to use them are another — that requires expertise in ‘extension,’ a word which has unfortunately fallen

Comment: Can we bring back our soil?

The Soil Conservation Council of Canada is calling for a united effort from the farming community, government and agriculture industry to make soil health a priority

If soil health isn’t top of mind for you, it should be. Canada has some of the world’s most viable and productive farmland. This farmland is where you make your living. It sustains our rural communities. It grows our food. While Canada is a world leader in improving our soils, further steps are necessary to