GFM Network News


Locust swarms raise food security concerns

Widespread crop damage could put 25 million in famine situation

MarketsFarm – Locust swarms reaching levels not seen in decades are raising concerns over food security from Africa to as far east as India, according to reports from the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations. The locust crisis has intensified since the beginning of 2020, but got its start in 2018 when

Currently available crop protection products can only knock back wireworms, not eliminate them.

Are wireworms’ days numbered?

Once you have wireworms, it’s hard to get rid of them, but that might be changing once BASF’s new seed treatment launches in 2021

Growers will soon be able to knock back wireworm populations rather than just holding the line. BASF says it is two years away from launching its new cereal seed treatment, Teraxxa, on both sides of the Canada-U.S. border. The seed treatment will introduce a new chemistry to the market. Teraxxa will be a Group 30


Pests like the corn leaf aphid could be in areas thought free of it, according to new research.

Crop pests often missed as they move into new areas

Finding where pests exist in the early stages of movement into an area are key to control

Insects and diseases that damage crops are probably present in many places thought to be free of them, new research shows. Pests that have not been reported in a certain area are usually assumed to be absent, but analysis by the University of Exeter shows many pests are “currently unobserved, but probably present” (a likelihood

Nine pests to watch for if you’re growing flax

Dr. James Tansey, Saskatchewan Agriculture’s insect specialist, reminded farmers at a Saskatchewan Agriculture conference in Weyburn, Sask., that “plants are not a passive part of the environment.” Flax produces poison in the form of cyanogenic glycoside (cyanide) that is toxic to several insects. However, your flax crop may still need some help protecting itself from

Corn, sunflower, soybeans enter reproductive phase, hay and forage yields far below normal

Manitoba Crop Report and Crop Weather report for July 23

Southwest Region Scattered showers and thunderstorms in the region brought some significant rain in few areas and very little in others. Day and nighttime temperature have been above normal, giving crops a big growth boost. Some yellowing occurring in fields due to wet conditions in low spots, but with improved conditions this past week, they


Spotted wing drosophila (Drosophila suzukii).

Fruit-eating bug marches west

It’s been a familiar sight in Manitoba for a while, 
and now seems set on new horizons

A pest that has targeted strawberries and other soft fruits in Manitoba could be headed west. The spotted wing drosophila, which is thought to have come from southeast Asia, has been spotted in Manitoba in small numbers. SWD’s presence in Alberta and British Columbia suggests Saskatchewan may be the bug’s next home. SWD is an

This Carolina grasshopper is a common sight on gravel roads but it’s not a threat to your crops.

Mistaken identity

Not everything that looks like a pest insect actually is

One of Manitoba’s best-known insect experts is reminding farmers to be sure of what they’re seeing when they scout. For example, that “wireworm” problem may not actually be a problem at all. Therevid larvae (the precursor to a large, hairy fly) are often mistaken for wireworms, provincial entomologist John Gavloski said during a May 22

Honeybees can’t rid themselves of deadly mites as effectively after neonic exposure, researchers say.

Neonics leave bees vulnerable to mites, study shows

The pesticides are shown to affect bees’ ability to groom themselves

Neonicotinoid pesticides affect honeybees’ ability to groom and rid themselves of deadly mites, a University of Guelph study has revealed. The research comes as Health Canada places new limits on the use of three key neonicotinoids while it decides whether to impose a full phase-out of the chemicals. Neonics are the most commonly used insecticides



Manitoba’s beekeepers say they saw less winterkill this year, despite frigid temperatures.

Beekeepers dodge winter loss woes

Initial reports hint at good winter survival for Manitoba’s bees

Manitoba’s frigid start to 2019 did little to phase the honey industry. The Manitoba Beekeepers Association says most of its members reported good winter survival rates, with the exception of some parts of the Interlake. Why it matters: Manitoba’s honey sector took a hit on winter survival last year, but this year’s numbers look more