GFM Network News


The railway arrived at the village of Mowbray, south of Manitou along the North Dakota border, in 1902.

Rural Manitoba ghost towns make an interesting day trip

You can imagine the days when the streets bustled with activity

For an interesting day trip in southern Manitoba, visit a couple of ‘ghost towns.’ Both were once thriving spots but now are virtually abandoned, except for one or two possibly inhabited buildings. Ste. Elizabeth, located about eight miles east of Morris on Highway 23 and a mile south on road 12 E, was established as

Deloraine’s former Presbyterian Church was only used for 21 years as a church.

Plan a day trip to visit a historic church

Manitoba’s small towns have many culturally significant houses of worship

Feeling housebound? With present-day limitations, consider alternatives. A rural drive can be a pleasant diversion — to view the scenery or visit some of our historic churches.  The buildings may be closed, but usually we can walk around them and explore nearby cemeteries. Depending on where you live, there are one or more historic churches


Elaine and Darrell Klym are the proud owners and managers of Farmers Hall, a much-loved old country hall just east of Gimli which they completely restored. The original building was built in the 1920s and for years bore the name United Farmers Community Hall over its doorway.

Farmers Hall restored to its former glory — and then some

A Gimli couple has completely renovated and restored a decade-old rural dance hall

It was once the heart of this farming community but by the early 1990s it looked like the last days were approaching for an old country hall on Hwy. 231 the locals called ‘Farmers.’ Its volunteer board had made the difficult decision to board up the building by then, with too many upgrades and repairs

A small wooden grain elevator in the village of Underhill, in what is now the Municipality of Grassland, was built in 1908 by the Underhill Farmers’ Elevator Company. One of three elevators operating here by 1917, its ownership was transferred to the provincial government in 1911, then leased and in 1926 purchased outright by United Grain Growers. In 1966, it was sold into private ownership. Graffiti on its side said “Burn Me Please.” It appears someone obliged and the elevator was gone by 
the mid-1990s.

PHOTOS: This Old Elevator: April 2016

The Manitoba Historical Society wants to gather information about all the grain elevators in Manitoba

In the 1950s, there were over 700 grain elevators in Manitoba. Today, there are fewer than 200. You can help to preserve the legacy of these disappearing “Prairie sentinels.” The Manitoba Historical Society (MHS) is gathering information about all elevators that ever stood in Manitoba, regardless of their present status. Collaborating with the Manitoba Co-operator

historic barn in Manitoba

Co-operator barn series revival

Do you know this barn?

If you do, a Manitoba historian wants to hear from you. In early 1981 the Co-operator worked with provincial Manitoba Historic Resources Branch staff to photograph and publish a series on rural buildings in Manitoba. Each week a photo and a story was published about why each of the buildings was rare or unusual. Now


red barn

Co-operator barn series revival

Do you know this barn?

If you do, a Manitoban historian wants to hear from you. In early 1981 the Co-operator worked with provincial Manitoba Historic Resources Branch staff to photograph and publish a series on rural buildings in Manitoba. Each week a photo and a story was published about why each of the buildings were rare or unusual. Now