GFM Network News


Over 10 years, the federal government is offering millions of dollars in agriculture-related incentives to assist producers in reducing their greenhouse gas emissions.

Comment: Farmers should get on board with green future

Not fighting climate change is no longer an option

Ottawa’s recently announced plans to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and increase the cost of carbon over the next 10 years was met with predictable outrage from many in the agriculture sector. Already frustrated over having to pay for carbon uses, many farmers see the expanded plan as a crippling tax that ignores previous efforts made

Alastair Handley, president of Radicle.

No getting off the carbon reduction train

Farmers might be able to sway government but Mr. Market is speaking loud and clear

Climate change initiatives such as carbon taxes might elicit a lot of negativity in the Canadian agriculture sector. But ignoring them could also mean ignoring big opportunities, according to Alastair Handley, president of Radicle (formerly Carbon Credit Solutions). He’s been involved in carbon markets since 2007, when he started developing a system for Alberta farmers


Biofuels mandate increased in Manitoba

GHG reductions come hand in hand with additional grain markets

Manitoba is boosting its blend — ethanol blend in gasoline, that is. Effective Jan. 1, 2021, the amount of ethanol required in gasoline will increase to 9.25 per cent from 8.5 per cent. It will further grow to 10 per cent on Jan. 1, 2022. The biodiesel requirement will increase to 3.5 per cent from

New Year sees increase in ethanol blend requirements

The Manitoba government announced plans on Dec. 22 to adopt new blend requirements for ethanol in gasoline and for biodiesel in diesel. “We are taking the steps necessary to meet our GHG reduction targets, and have extensively worked with and consulted stakeholders,” said Conservation and Climate Minister Sarah Guillemard. “We are leading the nation with

With Joe Biden as the incoming U.S. president, Canada’s climate policy may end up benefiting farmers.

Opinion: Biden’s victory a win for carbon pricing policy

Expect opposition to evaporate as one of the world’s largest economies signs on

President-elect Joe Biden’s climate strategy will lay waste to the opposition some Canadians have to our country’s carbon pricing policy. Biden campaigned on aggressively combating climate change. When he becomes president in January, it is expected he will create investment in green technologies. Like Canada, the United States will soon be trying to reach net-zero



U.S. beef ranchers sour on Burger King lemongrass ration

RBI arm launches '#CowsMenu' program, 'Reduced Methane' Whopper

A new U.S. sustainability campaign from one of the world’s biggest fast food chains, training its lens on beef cattle passing gas, has “disappointed” some cattle producers while also proposing its own new feedlot ration as a way to help cut emissions. Burger King, owned by Toronto-based Restaurant Brands International, on Tuesday launched the “#CowsMenu”

This map shows how North America appeared just over 12,000 years ago. During the Pleistocene, repeated glaciations occurred.

Farmers prevented the ice age

If it weren’t for the methane and carbon dioxide emissions of early farmers the world would look much different

Millenia ago, ancient farmers cleared land to plant wheat and maize, potatoes and squash. They flooded fields to grow rice. They began to raise livestock. And unknowingly, they may have been fundamentally altering the climate of the Earth. A study published in the journal Scientific Reports provides new evidence that ancient farming practices led to



Higher carbon dioxide levels could negatively impact the nutritional value of rice, an important crop to many lower-income countries.

Rice’s nutritional value decreases in higher CO2 concentrations

Researchers examine how climate change can impact dietary quality of crops

Rice grown at higher carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations, like those possible later this century, has lower nutritional value, according to a recent study. Notably, some varieties of rice seemed to react differently to increased levels of CO2, say the study’s authors, showing relatively smaller decreases in nutritional value. The finding that rice’s nutritional quality can