GFM Network News


Ted Unruh demonstrates his automatic fence lifter, which takes the place of a conventional gate.

Automatic fence lifter cuts labour on high-density grazing

Ted Unruh’s cattle are on the move four times a day, but the farmer isn’t usually in the field to see it

The first time Ted Unruh came across the idea of an automatic fence lifter, it was over social media. Unruh, along with a number of other farmers, had been chatting about a fence lifter that could take the place of a conventional gate, with some suggesting that a water jug could be used as a

Manitoba to open more Crown lands to haying, grazing

Province now taking requests for permits

Manitoba livestock producers up against dry conditions can now apply for temporary passes to get onto Crown land not normally designated for grazing or haying. The province announced Friday it will make such lands available this year for agricultural use “under certain circumstances.” Permits and land uses will be handled through the Agricultural Crown Lands


Pasture and forage projects get conservation funding nod

Pasture and forage projects were highlighted in the first round of Conservation Trust funding announcements for 2020

Manitoba’s forage and pasture organizations will account for major chunks of the first round of 2020 Conservation Trust funding announcements. Why it matters: One project from the Association of Manitoba Community Pastures and three from the Manitoba Forage and Grassland Association make up over $480,000 of the $1.8 million in Conservation Trust funding announced last week. The Association of Manitoba

Pastures have yet to find a spring boost, and as a result, there hasn't been much grass for grazing.

Cool weather slowing pasture growth

Overnight frosts likely didn’t hurt alfalfa stands

Frost and cold weather are delaying hay land and pasture growth this spring — this while some producers with short feed stocks are looking to put cattle out early. On May 13, temperature lows across the province included -8.5 C at Brandon, -8.1 C in Steinbach, and -10.2 C in Dauphin, according to Environment Canada data. “Presently pastures are short and there isn’t

Thomas and Felicity Hagan and family pose on their cow-calf and grass-fed beef operation near Oak Lake.

Grazing on display as Hagans take 2020 TESA award

Faces of Ag: Thomas and Felicity Hagan of Oak Lake have been named to this year’s provincial TESA award, given every year by the Manitoba Beef Producers to an operation that spotlights environmental farm practices

Thomas and Felicity Hagan of Oak Lake are the latest beef producers in the spotlight for their focus on the environment. The Hagans have been named to The Environmental Stewardship Award (TESA) for Manitoba this year. The award, offered locally through the Manitoba Beef Producers, recognizes a beef operation that goes, “above and beyond standard


Pasture forage for beef production requires better insurance options, the Manitoba Beef Producers says.

Waiting on word for forage insurance

Manitoba Beef Producers has highlighted forage insurance issues it would like to see addressed

Producers are waiting for details of the province’s promised forage insurance review. The province announced the review last year as producers came off another disappointing grazing season and were facing the prospect of feed shortages and high feed prices. Agriculture and Resource Development Minister Blaine Pedersen says he wants to get to the bottom of

Manitoba cattle producers will now have wildlife loss insurance coverage for extended grazing practices.

Extended grazing to get wildlife loss coverage

Deer getting first bite at your swath grazing? Now there’s insurance for that

Cattle producers may not be able to keep wildlife off their grazing swaths, but at least now they can get paid for the loss. Bale grazing, swath grazing and grazing standing annual crops (including corn) will all be eligible for wildlife damage insurance this year, Manitoba Agricultural Services Corp. (MASC) has said. The new program

Agriculture Minister Blaine Pedersen outlined what’s new in Manitoba for crop insurance during a presentation Jan. 21 at Ag Days in Brandon.

Crop insurance: What’s new in 2020?

The organic sector, farmers with extended grazing and high-value crop growers can all expect more insurance options this year

Crop insurance coverage is poised for another increase in 2020, according to Manitoba Agricultural Services Corp. (MASC). AgriInsurance coverage will hit $3 billion this year, with similar premiums to 2019. Why it matters: Better production knowledge has yields, and coverage, trending up, while the organic sector and producers with extended grazing will get more safety


Year in review: Ranchers brace for another short feed winter

It’s a bad case of deja vu for livestock producers facing stressed pastures come 2020

Livestock producers were already starting from behind in 2019. Producers were already looking at a feed shortage after drought conditions stuck much of the province in 2018, particularly areas of southwest Manitoba and the Interlake. Most of agricultural Manitoba had qualified for the federal livestock tax deferral program in 2018 — a program that allows

Manitoba Beef Producers president Tom Teichroeb addressed worries on Agricultural Crown Land changes, and what MBP will do about them, during a packed lease holders' meeting in Ste. Rose du Lac Oct. 2, 2019.

Crown Land changes outrage Manitoba ranchers

Tension was high in the Ste. Rose du Lac community hall Oct. 2 during a last-minute meeting of forage and grazing Crown Land leaseholders

Ranchers in the Parkland and Interlake say they are worried that changes to the province’s Agricultural Crown Lands regulations will cost them their farms. It was standing room only at the community hall in Ste. Rose du Lac Oct. 2 as over 350 leaseholders came to express their outrage over incoming regulations. The new regulations,