GFM Network News


The charred remnants of the rail bridge, destroyed by a wildfire on June 30, is seen during a media tour by authorities in Lytton, British Columbia, July 9, 2021.

Lytton bridge reopened but grain movement ‘hit and miss’

Wildfires in British Columbia continue to disrupt Prairie grain movement

CN Rail’s, fire-damaged bridge at Lytton, B.C. reopened for traffic July 13, but all train movement, including for grain, through British Columbia’s wildfire-ravaged southern Interior, is “hit and miss” and will remain so until the fire risk lessens. “Both railways (including CP Rail) are having troubles because there are so many fires in the area,”

Charred remnants of a rail bridge destroyed by a wildfire on June 30 are seen during a media tour by authorities in Lytton, B.C. on July 9, 2021. (Photo: Reuters/Jennifer Gauthier)

Lytton bridge re-opened but grain movement ‘hit and miss’

B.C. wildfires continue to disrupt Prairie grain movement

Canadian National Railway’s fire-damaged bridge at Lytton, B.C. reopened for traffic Tuesday — but all train movement, including for grain, through British Columbia’s wildfire-ravaged southern Interior, is “hit and miss” and will remain so until the fire risk lessens. “Both (CN and Canadian Pacific Railway) are having troubles because there are so many fires in


Grain ships continue to arrive at Canadian ports, suggesting the possibility of another record despite tight grain supplies.

Is a grain shipping three-peat on the horizon?

Grain movement has been running at a record pace during the 2020-21 crop year, but will it continue to the July 31 finish line?

The record-setting pace of western grain moving to port thus far could see a three-peat when the 2020-21 crop year ends July 31. Canada’s grain monitor Mark Hemmes, president of Quorum Corporation, speculated in an interview in October 2020 — less than three months into the current crop year — it was possible grain moved by rail from

Preparation of samples for analysis by digital polymerase chain reaction (PCR) equipment at the Grain Research Laboratory.

Grain sector says government should fund Grain Research Lab

Strong support for work done, calls for more government support

The Canadian Grain Commission’s (CGC) Grain Research Laboratory (GRL) is a public good and therefore the Canadian government should fund its work, rather the grain sector. That’s a recommendation a number of farm and grain industry groups make in their submissions to Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada’s (AAFC) review of the Canada Grain Act and the

Outward inspection is one of the biggest bones of contention in a review of the Canada Grain Act and Canadian Grain Commission.

Where’s the Canadian Grain Commission headed?

Industry groups outline changes they want in the Canada Grain Act and Canadian Grain Commission

The future of the Canadian Grain Commission (CGC), whose statutory mandate since 1912 has been to regulate western Canadian grain quality in the interest of farmers, is getting closer to being determined. Why it matters: For 109 years the Canadian Grain Commission, under authority of the Canada Grain Act, has regulated Western Canada’s multibillion-dollar grain


More market transparency needed

Grain act reviews trigger farmer calls for more grain sales data collection

Western grain farmers need more timely information about grain sales and exports to improve market transparency and returns to farmers, the Saskatchewan Wheat Development Commission (Sask Wheat) says in its submission on changes to the Canada Grain Act and Canadian Grain Commission (CGC). The Agricultural Producers of Saskatchewan (APAS) and the National Farmers Union (NFU)

Mandatory Canadian Grain Commission outward inspection contentious

Mandatory Canadian Grain Commission outward inspection contentious

Some farm groups say it’s key to grain quality assurance, but the elevator association disagrees

Of all the issues concerning the Canadian Grain Commission (CGC), its role in outward inspection is one of the most contentious. The Saskatchewan Wheat Development Commission (Sask Wheat), Agricultural Producers of Saskatchewan (APAS) and the National Farmers Union (NFU) say in their submissions on the grain act and CGC that retaining mandatory CGC outward inspection

The Canadian Grain Commission building on Main Street in Winnipeg. (File photo)

Virtual town hall on federal Grain Act set for Friday

Time is running out on consultations, but the April 23 event gives farmers a chance to provide input

The deadline for submitting comments to the federal government’s review of the Canada Grain Act and Canadian Grain Commission (CGC) is April 30, but farmers can also offer feedback at a ‘virtual’ town hall meeting this Friday. The Grain Act and its regulations provide the framework for Canada’s grain quality assurance system and it’s the


(Video screengrab from Richardson.ca)

Richardson to upgrade western Manitoba elevator

High-throughput to replace wooden crib structure at Swan River

Prairie grain handler Richardson Pioneer plans to start work this spring on a new high-throughput elevator “effectively replacing” its Swan River Valley unit in northwestern Manitoba. The Winnipeg company’s current site, on Canadian National Railway (CN) track about six kilometres north of the town of Swan River, is anchored by a wooden crib workhouse and

Big grain companies want big changes at Canada’s biggest port

Big grain companies want big changes at Canada’s biggest port

The Western Grain Elevator Association wants more say and more transparency in how the Port of Vancouver operates

Canada’s biggest grain companies want sweeping changes to how the Port of Vancouver, Canada’s biggest port, including for grain, operates. “We are trying to promote a solution that allows Canada to reach its targeted goal of $85 billion in (food and agricultural) exports by 2025,” Wade Sobkowich, executive director of the Western Grain Elevator Association