GFM Network News


Manitoba’s Pelly Lake water-control project is cited as one example of how natural features can control flooding more cheaply than engineered structures.

‘Natural infrastructure’ — retain what you have; restore what’s lost

A new report says natural infrastructure can be cheaper than built infrastructure for controlling floods

Saving and carefully managing of wetlands, forests and other working natural landscapes can save Canadians millions in yearly flood damage costs, says a new report supported in part by the Insurance Bureau of Canada. This ‘natural infrastructure’ is also a viable and cost-effective alternative to traditional — and often much more expensive — built flood

DIVIDED OVER WATER: Outlet channels spark controversy

Farmers on the south end of Lake Manitoba support the proposed channels to save their land from flooding, but the projects will slice through the farms of dozens of north-shore farmers who worry they won’t be adequately compensated

A recent $540-million funding pledge is pushing forward the Lake Manitoba and Lake St. Martin outlet channels and reaction from farmers depends on where they are along the shoreline. For those whose anxieties rise with the water levels every time the Assiniboine River floods, the new momentum is welcome news. Farmers along Lake Manitoba’s south


The swollen Red River engulfs farmyards in this aerial file photo. River floods will be a growing risk as the climate warms, scientists say.

Warming will put millions more at flood risk

The risks are greatest where governments lack the funds to improve infrastructure

Thomson Reuters Foundation – Unless countries urgently boost their flood defences, millions more people will be at risk from river flooding in the next 20 years. Scientists say as global warming increases, so will the likelihood of severe rainfall. In Asia, the numbers at risk will more than double to 156 million, up from 70

Strong winds, precipitation in forecast could increase flood risk

Manitoba Flood Bulletin No. 16

Province of Manitoba – Manitoba Infrastructure’s Hydrologic Forecast Centre reports overland flooding and tributary flows continue to subside across parts of southern Manitoba. Flows on the lower Assiniboine River are continuing to rise. Weather forecasts are predicting strong winds for April 13 to 16, as a low-pressure system begins to move from west to east

Earthmovers roll to shore up dikes

Our History: April 1997

This photo of earthmoving equipment heading to shore up dikes south of Winnipeg ran in our April 24, 1997 issue, which was three weeks after the record April 5 blizzard that led to “The flood of the century.” A less well-remembered effect of that blizzard was its effect south of the border. We reported that


A washed-out road closes Provincial Road 346 south of Highway 2 April 4.

Waters rise in the west as Red River subsides

Attention turned back to southwestern Manitoba as the Souris and 
Assiniboine rivers were expected to crest simultaneously

Flooding was on the decline in parts of Manitoba late last week, but the Assiniboine River was on the rise. Simultaneous peaks of the Souris and Assiniboine rivers raised concern downstream. Flow into the Portage Reservoir was expected to reach 41,000 to 44,000 cubic feet per second April 12-14. The region between Portage la Prairie

Assiniboine River flows continue to rise, rain forecast could raise flood risk

Manitoba Flood Bulletin No. 15

Province of Manitoba – Manitoba Infrastructure’s Hydrologic Forecast Centre reports overland flooding and tributary flows continue to subside across parts of southern Manitoba. Flows in the Assiniboine River are continuing to rise. Weather forecasts are predicting strong winds for April 13 to 16, as a low-pressure system begins to move from west to east across

Flood warning remains for upper Assiniboine, all major rivers ice-free

Manitoba Flood Bulletin No. 14

Province of Manitoba – Manitoba Infrastructure’s Hydrologic Forecast Centre reports overland flooding and tributary flows are beginning to subside across parts of southern Manitoba. Flows in the Assiniboine River are continuing to rise. Ice is still in place on northern rivers and tributaries. A high water advisory is in place for the Carrot River near


Assiniboine River, Souris River to soon peak at Portage Reservoir

Manitoba Flood Bulletin No. 13

Province of Manitoba – Manitoba Infrastructure’s Hydrologic Forecast Centre reports overland flooding and tributary flows are beginning to subside across parts of southern Manitoba. Flows in the Assiniboine River are continuing to rise. Ice is still in place on northern rivers and tributaries. A high water advisory is in place for the Carrot River near

Flood watch in effect for Portage, flood warnings for all Souris River areas

Manitoba Flood Bulletin No. 11

Province of Manitoba – Manitoba Infrastructure’s Hydrologic Forecast Centre reports overland flooding and tributary flows are beginning to subside across parts of southern Manitoba. Flows in the Assiniboine River are continuing to rise. Ice is still in place on northern rivers and tributaries, while most rivers in southern Manitoba are ice free. As of this